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Who will win the Biletnikoff Award in 2014?
September 10, 2014
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Who will win the Biletnikoff Award in 2014?

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September 27, 2014
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Amari Cooper, Nelson Agholor among top WRs to watch in 2014

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Dave Martin / Associated Press
Amari Cooper will be under close watch this fall as NFL teams continue to monitor potential future game changers.

The wide-open nature of the college game has helped wide receivers become the marquee playmakers on offense. Innovative coaches are using more spread formations to turn football into basketball on grass, which allows explosive receivers to take advantage of one-on-one matchups in space.

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Kansas State Wildcats wide receiver Tyler Lockett (16) catches a pass for a touchdown while being defended by Oklahoma Sooners defensive back Cortez Johnson (22) during the first half at Bill Snyder Family Stadium. (Jasen Vinlove/USA TODAY Sports)Image Enlarger
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Top college WRs to watch in 2014

Take a look ahead to the 2014 college football season with the best wide receivers to follow this fall.

With NFL play callers prone to stealing ideas from the collegiate ranks, more teams are placing a greater emphasis on adding receivers with the speed, quickness and explosiveness to turn short passes into big gains. As a result, we are seeing more pass-catchers come off the board in the early rounds, including five receivers selected on Day 1 of the 2014 NFL Draft.

After surveying the collegiate landscape for the top players at the position, here's the group of wide receivers to watch in the fall:

1. Amari Cooper, Alabama

The junior standout is the prototypical No. 1 receiver that NFL coaches and scouts covet as the anchor of a passing game. Cooper is a big, athletic playmaker with exceptional ball skills and hands. Most important, he is a smooth, fluid route runner capable of running every route in the book, which makes him the ideal receiver to feature in a game plan. With a resume of standout production (16.8 yards per catch; seven receptions of 50-plus yards and 15 total touchdowns in two seasons), Cooper is squarely in the crosshairs of NFL scouts looking for a potential playmaker to build around in a few years.

2. Nelson Agholor, USC

The Trojans have churned out a number of NFL receivers over the past decade, but Agholor has a chance to be one of the best to come out of USC since Keyshawn Johnson. He is a natural route runner with outstanding ball skills and hands. Additionally, Agholor is a sneaky runner with a knack for turning short passes into big gains due to his underrated kick-return skills (19.1 average with 2 TDs). Given the importance NFL coaches place on RAC (run after catch) yards, Agholor's spectacular game is perfectly suited for a West Coast offense at the next level.

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14 for '14 series:
CFB 24/7 counts down the 14 college football players or coaches to watch in varying categories in 2014.

» Top small-school prospects
» Impact freshmen in college football
» Top rivalries in college football
» Top personalities in college football
» Best uniforms in college football
» Best stadiums in college football
» Biggest hitters in college football
» Hot coordinators in college football
» Best recruiters in college football
» Hot-seat coaches in college football
» Best coaches in college football
» Best names in college football
» Heaviest players in college football
» Smallest players in college football
» Top celebrity college football fans
» Top Heisman Trophy candidates
» Most explosive athletes in college football
» Most versatile players in college football
» Most freakish athletes in college football
» Scariest players in college football
» Fastest players in college football
» Toughest players in college football
» Smartest players in college football
» Most physical players in college football
» College football players with best intangibles

3. Antwan Goodley, Baylor

Whoa! That's the only word to accurately describe the reaction of NFL scouts when they take a long, hard look at Goodley's "touch" tape from the 2013 season. The 5-foot-11, 225-pound junior totaled 71 receptions for 1,339 yards (18.9 avg.) and 13 touchdowns, while displaying a rare combination of speed, strength and power on the perimeter. Although Goodley is raw and unrefined as a route runner, his explosiveness and playmaking ability vault him to the top of the list in the minds of NFL evaluators. If he continues to progress at a rapid rate, he will be the next Baylor pass-catcher (Josh Gordon, Kendall Wright and Terrance Williams) to make an impact at the next level.

4. Ty Montgomery, Stanford

Dual-threat playmakers are always valued at a premium in pre-draft meetings, which is why scouts are salivating over Montgomery's pro potential. The senior standout is arguably the most explosive returner in college football, but is equally impressive as a pass-catcher. Montgomery averaged 15.7 yards per catch in 2013 with 10 touchdown catches, while also ranking second in kickoff returns with a 30.3-yard average and two return scores. Those numbers are not only indicative of his overall explosiveness, but it speaks volumes about his playmaking ability in the open field. Thus, it is not surprising to hear scouts rave about his upside and potential as a future pro.

5. Rashad Greene, Florida State

For all of the praise heaped in Kelvin Benjamin's direction for enhancing Jameis Winston's playmaking ability, it was the steady production from Greene that steadied the Seminoles' passing game. The 6-0, 178-pound senior finished last season with 76 receptions for 1,128 yards and nine touchdowns, while exhibiting precise route-running skills as a versatile playmaker in the passing game. Greene is a rare receiver capable of stretching the field on vertical routes, while also doing the dirty work inside the numbers. With Winston expected to make a significant jump in his development as a second-year starter, Greene could put up ridiculous numbers as the Seminoles' No. 1 receiver.

 

 

6. Tyler Lockett, Kansas State

Scouts love prospects with close ties to the NFL because they are familiar with the bright lights and big stage of the pro game. Lockett is well prepared to play at the next level after watching his dad, Kevin, and uncle, Aaron, have success at K-State and then move on to the professional ranks. The experience has helped Lockett develop a refined game that overwhelms defenders on the perimeter. He is the most polished route runner in college football, with a bag of tricks that is comparable to a long-time NFL veteran. In addition, Lockett is a dynamic returner with a knack for putting the ball in the paint on kick returns (four career TD returns). With playmakers coveted at a premium, scouts are paying close attention to Lockett's continued development as a receiver/returner this fall.

7. DeVante Parker, Louisville

Parker surprised some experts by passing up an opportunity to jump to the pros following a solid junior campaign (55 receptions for 885 yards and 12 touchdowns). But the 6-3, 209-pound standout elected to spend another season at Louisville and will be refining his game in Bobby Petrino's pro-style system. With a breakout performance in the Russell Athletic Bowl (nine receptions for 142 yards and a TD) setting the stage for a monster senior season, Parker must continue to show scouts that he has the skills to develop into a No. 1 receiver as a pro.

8. Dres Anderson, Utah

Like father, like son? That's the question NFL scouts are pondering after watching Anderson put up spectacular numbers at Utah in 2013. He tied for the national lead in receptions of 50-plus yards (seven), while posting an astonishing 18.9-yards-per-catch average -- third-best among receivers with at least 50 catches (he trailed Mike Evans and Odell Beckham). As a vertical playmaker with speed, quickness and burst, Anderson is not only a remake of his dad (Willie "Flipper" Anderson), but also the home-run hitter every offensive coordinator covets on the perimeter.

9. Jamison Crowder, Duke

The NFL has become a big man's game, but that won't stop scouts from falling in love with Crowder's skill this fall. The 5-9, 175-pound senior is one of the most explosive pass-catchers in college football. He has amassed 13 receptions of 40-plus yards over the past two seasons, with four of his eight touchdowns in 2013 covering at least 58 yards. Although his big-play ability is impressive, it is Crowder's steady production as an intermediate route runner that has scouts envisioning the Blue Devils' standout blossoming into a dynamic slot receiver at the next level. With his superb return skills bolstering his case as a "catch-and-run" specialist, Crowder is an intriguing prospect to keep an eye on this fall.

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A USC song girl cheerleader performs during an NCAA college football game between UCLA and USC on Saturday, November 30, 2013, in Los Angeles. (Michael Yanow/NFL)Image Enlarger
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College football cheerleaders

Take a look at the cheerleaders of college football in action during the 2013 season.

10. Justin Hardy, East Carolina

The numbers never lie. That's what NFL scouts are saying after taking a long, hard look at Hardy's tape from the 2013 season. The silky-smooth pass-catcher surpassed the 1,000-yard mark for the second consecutive season, with a 111-catch, 1,284-yard effort as a junior. He ranks second on ECU's all-time list in receptions and receiving yards, but already owns the school record for career touchdown receptions (25) as a rare three-year starter. Hardy is a dynamic playmaker with excellent stop-start quickness and route-running ability. He complements those traits with outstanding ball skills and hands. Factor in his wiggle and elusiveness in the open field, and Hardy could develop into a standout slot receiver at the next level.

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September 28, 2014
5:01 pm
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The Tide's Amari Cooper has looked great. And he will have played an incredibly difficult schedule.Those SEC schools have great defensive players. Check the last 10 NFL drafts.

Colorado's Nelson Spruce is off to a fine start with 10 TDs and  56 catches.

If LSU's Travin Dural gets more touches (he only has 21 receptions), he could be a factor.

Same with Baylor's KD Cannon.

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October 13, 2014
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NCAA FBS Receiving Stats after week 7:

FBS (I-A) Player Receiving Statistics - 2014

 

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Statistics: Passing | Rushing | Receiving | Scoring | Returning | Kicking | Punting | Defense
Season:
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004

Group: FBS (Division I-A) | FCS (Division I-AA)

Receiving Yards Leaders - All Players

RK PLAYER TEAM REC YDS AVG LONG TD
1 Kevin White, WR WVU 61 888 14.6 68 5
2 Vince Mayle, WR WSU 57 781 13.7 90 7
3 Rashard Higgins, WR CSU 44 776 17.6 73 10
4 Amari Cooper, WR ALA 54 768 14.2 79 5
5 Nelson Spruce, WR COLO 62 732 11.8 71 10
6 Sterling Shepard, WR OKLA 34 714 21.0 75 4
7 David Frazier, WR M-OH 40 707 17.7 74 4
8 Tajae Sharpe, WR UMASS 43 697 16.2 77 4
9 Roger Lewis, WR BGSU 51 695 13.6 61 3
10 Rashad Greene, WR FSU 44 683 15.5 74 3
RK PLAYER TEAM REC YDS AVG LONG TD
11 River Cracraft, WR WSU 57 676 11.9 86 7
12 Teldrick Morgan, WR NMSU 53 675 12.7 57 5
13 Joshua McCain, WR IDHO 43 665 15.5 75 6
14 Tony Lippett, WR MSU 32 663 20.7 71 8
15 KD Cannon, WR BAY 30 651 21.7 89 6
16 Keevan Lucas, WR TLSA 53 649 12.2 84 7
17 Hunter Sharp, WR USU 40 642 16.1 81 5
18 Josh Harper, WR FRES 47 637 13.6 58 3
19 Isiah Myers, WR WSU 53 627 11.8 67 7
20 Travin Dural, WR LSU 24 626 26.1 94 6
RK PLAYER TEAM REC YDS AVG LONG TD
21 Jaelen Strong, WR ASU 41 614 15.0 77 5
22 Mike Dudek, WR ILL 37 598 16.2 49 3
23 Justin Hardy, WR ECU 47 593 12.6 38 5
24 Cayleb Jones, WR ARIZ 39 592 15.2 85 6
25 Daniel Braverman, WR WMU 48 591 12.3 57 4
26 DaeSean Hamilton, WR PSU 43 560 13.0 51 1
27 Jakeem Grant, WR TTU 44 557 12.7 43 5
28 Jordan Payton, WR UCLA 37 552 14.9 80 5
29 Phillip Dorsett, WR MIA 16 550 34.4 79 6
30 Leonte Carroo, WR RUTG 29 548 18.9 78 5
RK PLAYER TEAM REC YDS AVG LONG TD
31 Corey Jones, WR TOL 49 544 11.1 64 2
32 Mike Williams, WR CLEM 22 543 24.7 56 4
33 Corey Davis, WR WMU 29 542 18.7 75 4
34 Geno Lewis, WR PSU 32 512 16.0 79 1
35 Zach Pascal, WR ODU 37 509 13.8 45 5
36 William Fuller, WR ND 35 504 14.4 75 7
37 Da'Ron Brown, WR NIU 29 499 17.2 59 4
38 Dom Williams, WR WSU 24 496 20.7 84 6
39 D'haquille Williams, WR AUB 31 493 15.9 62 5
40 Alonzo Russell, WR TOL 33 490 14.8 54 6
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October 14, 2014
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Hunter Sharp looks like he could be added to the BA watch list--he is coming on strong!!

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November 18, 2014
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The College Football Huddle

Home / American Athletic Football / College Football / Headlines / ECU’s Justin Hardy Could Be Most Underrated WR in CFB History

ECU’s Justin Hardy Could Be Most Underrated WR in CFB History

— November 17, 2014

From a statistical profile, you could argue that East Carolina wide receiver Justin Hardy is the best to play the position in college football history. He’s one of the most underrated, to say the last.

Hardy’s 15-catch, 181-yard performance in the Pirates’ 54-46 loss to Cincinnati last week is a microcosm of an illustrious career that has him in position to break the NCAA’s all-time record for receptions (349) by early Saturday evening.

It was a game in which both offenses were all too familiar with the end zone, and he was overlooked—yet again—because of the scoreboard’s end result. The preseason All-American dominated the Bearcats’ secondary, recording 21 targets on the night (16 in the first half) while converting eight first downs, four of which came in a pivotal third-down situation. He also showed his big-play ability, catching two downfield passes of 31 yards apiece.

This isn’t the first time Hardy has exploded for numbers like these. In fact, such outings have become commonplace for the soon-to-be record-breaking senior.

For more American football coverage, visit AACFootballFever.com.

As a four-year starter and the favorite target in a passing attack that has averaged over 270 yards per game since 2011 (368.3 in 2014), Hardy has 13 games with 10 receptions or more, four with 15-plus, and has broken the 100-yard mark 14 times. He’s also been in the nation’s Top 4 in receptions per game over the last two years.

But probably the most important stat that absolutely jumps off the page and suggests his supremacy as one of premier mid-major receivers in the history of college football: Hardy is 45-for-45 when it comes to recording at least one reception for every game he’s played in. To buff that one up a bit, he’s never been held to less than three.

Let that one sink in for a minute. 45 games, people. 45!

“Hardy has a nice hesitation move to gain clearance against press coverage,” CBS Sports’ Rob Rang wrote earlier this season. “Though he doesn’t possess elite top-end speed, Hardy accelerates quickly and cuts sharply. He has good vision and balance to shake would-be tacklers with the ball in his hands.”

In terms of consistency, there might not be anyone better to have ever stepped on the gridiron. Current FBS all-time leader and former Oklahoma wide receiver Ryan Broyles didn’t have four seasons with at least 60 receptions like Hardy. Purdue’s Taylor Stubblefield only had five touchdowns through his first three seasons. Houston standout Tyron Carrier couldn’t break the single-season 100-reception mark, and Antonio Brown didn’t stick around with Central Michigan long enough to vie for consideration.

Back in 2012, offensive coordinator Lincoln Riley—who coached receivers Michael Crabtree and Wes Welker while at Texas Tech—predicted that Hardy would end up being one of the best players to ever come through East Carolina, and reminded him of a hybrid between the two now-NFL products.

“Justin catches the ball like Crabtree in a sense that it’s effortless,” Riley said. “He’s not the fastest receiver on the field, but he plays at a high speed like Welker. There’s just never any hesitation or confusion in the way he plays.”

Considering how good the 6-foot, 185-pound Vanceboro (NC) native has been in the grand scheme of it all, it’s remarkable to think that he wasn’t even given a rating by 247Sports coming out of high school, didn’t accumulate a single scholarship offer, and was a preferred walk-on with the Pirates in 2010.

Now, Hardy is four catches away from being college football’s all-time leader in the category and is projected to be anywhere from a second- to- fourth-round pick in the 2015 NFL Draft, according to various draft websites.

And if Riley’s analysis is anywhere close to accurate, then Hardy is primed to continue his massive productivity and achieve great things at the next level.

“Hardy exhibits excellent polish and quickness as a route runner, consistently separating from coverage to give his quarterback an open target,” says draftbreakdown.com. “He is a natural hands catcher with exceptional ball skills, showing the ability to adjust to errant throws, naking even the toughest catches look routine. A talented punt returner, Hardy is an elusive ball carrier who can make defenders miss and slip open-field tackles.

“He is a smart player who is quick to recognize th blitz and break off his route to give his quarterback a safety outlet. Despite his size, Hardy displays good effort and technique as a blocker.”

With Tulane, Tulsa, Central Florida, and a bowl game left on East Carolina’s schedule, Hardy is on pace to beat his personal best of 114 single-season receptions by two, which would bring his career total to 382 and bump his overall average to 7.8 per game.

He is undoubtedly one of the most all-around effective receivers in recent memory, and could go down as the most underrated in the history of the game.

Group of 5 Headlines

ECU’s Justin Hardy Could Be Most Underrated WR in CFB History

— November 17, 2014

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November 18, 2014
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Welcome to the board, Jim Newman.

Seems like a few ECU fanboys are angry that the excellent receiver Justin Hardy was not selected by the Biletnikoff Award National Selection Committee as one of the 10 semifinalists.

Let's look at this issue.

First, I find it amusing that a couple of sportswriters are so outraged at the Foundation (Biletnikoff Award), when the Foundation does not vote.

There are 265 voters on the selection committee. Take a look at the voter list at biletnikoffaward.com web site. This is a great list (second only to the Heisman in quality) with a ton of great commentators and journalists with a smattering of former outstanding receivers. Balanced geographically. Lots of very smart people.

Now, take a look at who made the semifinalists list:

Nelson Agholor (USC): 82 catches, 1,079 yards, 13.2 ypc, 10 TDs
Amari Cooper (Alabama): 87 catches, 1,303 yards*,15 ypc, 11 TDs
Rashad Greene (Florida State): 75 catches, 1,042 yards, 13.9 ypc, 5 TDs
Rashard Higgins (Colorado State): 67 catches, 1,280 yards,19.1 ypc, 13 TDs*
Tyler Lockett (K-State): 60 catches, 878 yards,14.6 ypc, 6 TDs
Vince Mayle (Washington State): 86 catches, 1,152 yards,13.4 ypc, 9 TDs
Sterling Shepard (Oklahoma): 50 catches, 957 yards, 19.1 ypc, 5 TDs
Nelson Spruce (Colorado): 99 catches*, 1,091 yards,11 ypc, 11 TDs
Jaelen Strong (Arizona State): 71 catches, 982 yards,13.8 ypc, 9 TDs
Kevin White (West Virginia): 91 catches, 1,207 yards,13.3 ypc, 8 TDs

*Denotes FBS leader

Who of the 10 is Justin Hardy clearly better than?

Hardy would be behind everybody but Spruce in yards per catch. Hardy had 12.4 ypc. Spruce has 11 ypc, but Spruce had 11 TDs to Hardy's 7 TDs. Spruce caught 99 passes, the leading total in D1 (FBS). Hardy caught 80.

And look at Strength of Schedule (one of criteria on the Biletnikoff Award web site under voting criteria). Colorado plays the 26th toughest schedule in college football. East Carolina? Not so much. Only the 88th!!

Just who is Hardy clearly better than on the semifinalist list? Nobody. Not clearly. Not even just better. I mean to be outraged there has to be some monumental injustice, right?

The award is not a career award. It is the outstanding receiver of that year.

 Let's look further.

Hardy is barely ahead in receiving yardage of only Jaelen Strong, Sterling Shepard, and Tyler Lockett of the ten. But, Strong has a better ypc (13.8--12.4) and 9 TDs. And Arizona State has the 27th toughest schedule in the country to ECU's 88th. Good Lord!

Shepard has a 19.1 ypc average; he smokes Hardy's 12.4 ypc! And he plays for Oklahoma which has the 12th toughest schedule in college football.

Lockett has a 14.6 ypc average, over 2 yards a catch higher than Hardy's. Hardy has 1 more TD. But, Lockett plays the 35th toughest schedule in college football.

Hardy, like Lippett  and a few other receivers not on the semifinalist list, is an excellent receiver. Another year, maybe Hardy and Lippett both make the semifinalists. I like them both; they are terrific receivers and seemingly good guys. Just not this year. Too many great receivers this year!

Bottom line: Hardy is most certainly NOT clearly better or even just better that any of the ten receivers who made the semifinalist list!

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cheerleader111 said
Welcome to the board, Jim Newman.

Seems like a few ECU fanboys are angry that the excellent receiver Justin Hardy was not selected by the Biletnikoff Award National Selection Committee as one of the 10 semifinalists.

Let's look at this issue.

First, I find it amusing that a couple of sportswriters are so outraged at the Foundation (Biletnikoff Award), when the Foundation does not vote.

There are 265 voters on the selection committee. Take a look at the voter list at biletnikoffaward.com web site. This is a great list (second only to the Heisman in quality) with a ton of great commentators and journalists with a smattering of former outstanding receivers. Balanced geographically. Lots of very smart people.

Now, take a look at who made the semifinalists list:

Nelson Agholor (USC): 82 catches, 1,079 yards, 13.2 ypc, 10 TDs
Amari Cooper (Alabama): 87 catches, 1,303 yards*,15 ypc, 11 TDs
Rashad Greene (Florida State): 75 catches, 1,042 yards, 13.9 ypc, 5 TDs
Rashard Higgins (Colorado State): 67 catches, 1,280 yards,19.1 ypc, 13 TDs*
Tyler Lockett (K-State): 60 catches, 878 yards,14.6 ypc, 6 TDs
Vince Mayle (Washington State): 86 catches, 1,152 yards,13.4 ypc, 9 TDs
Sterling Shepard (Oklahoma): 50 catches, 957 yards, 19.1 ypc, 5 TDs
Nelson Spruce (Colorado): 99 catches*, 1,091 yards,11 ypc, 11 TDs
Jaelen Strong (Arizona State): 71 catches, 982 yards,13.8 ypc, 9 TDs
Kevin White (West Virginia): 91 catches, 1,207 yards,13.3 ypc, 8 TDs

*Denotes FBS leader

Who of the 10 is Justin Hardy clearly better than?

Hardy would be behind everybody but Spruce in yards per catch. Hardy had 12.4 ypc. Spruce has 11 ypc, but Spruce had 11 TDs to Hardy's 7 TDs. Spruce caught 99 passes, the leading total in D1 (FBS). Hardy caught 80.

And look at Strength of Schedule (one of criteria on the Biletnikoff Award web site under voting criteria). Colorado plays the 26th toughest schedule in college football. East Carolina? Not so much. Only the 88th!!

Just who is Hardy clearly better than on the semifinalist list? Nobody. Not clearly. Not even just better. I mean to be outraged there has to be some monumental injustice, right?

The award is not a career award. It is the outstanding receiver of that year.

 Let's look further.

Hardy is barely ahead in receiving yardage of only Jaelen Strong, Sterling Shepard, and Tyler Lockett of the ten. But, Strong has a better ypc (13.8--12.4) and 9 TDs. And Arizona State has the 27th toughest schedule in the country to ECU's 88th. Good Lord!

Shepard has a 19.1 ypc average; he smokes Hardy's 12.4 ypc! And he plays for Oklahoma which has the 12th toughest schedule in college football.

Lockett has a 14.6 ypc average, over 2 yards a catch higher than Hardy's. Hardy has 1 more TD. But, Lockett plays the 35th toughest schedule in college football.

Hardy, like Lippett  and a few other receivers not on the semifinalist list, is an excellent receiver. Another year, maybe Hardy and Lippett both make the semifinalists. I like them both; they are terrific receivers and seemingly good guys. Just not this year. Too many great receivers this year!

Bottom line: Hardy is most certainly NOT clearly better or even just better that any of the ten receivers who made the semifinalist list!

Cheerleader111, another outstanding post.

What makes this manufactured matter interesting is that the sports writer who is whining the most, in an attempt to show ECU fans he is one of them, is a dude named Brett Friedlander.

Remember 2 years ago? He was screaming bloody murder because Sammy Watkins was not on the 2012 Biletnikoff Award preseason watch list. Friedlander was listed as a  Biletnikoff voter, at least he said he was in his column. Along with raising hell about Watkins exclusion, Friedlander also wrote that the award did not have a write-in mechanism so that voters could vote for receivers not on the watch list.

Now , keep in mind in 2012 that Friedlander was admittedly a voter. He states that he is a voter in a number of columns. He likes the prestige (and the Biletnikoff Award may be the 3rd most prestigious individual award in college football), but then slams the award in an attempt to lure in Clemson fans, like ECU fans now. What a man! Also, he is a dumb ass. The dumb ass did not even know the rule--that ineligible players (Clemson had ruled Watkins was suspended from football) cannot be on the BA watch list (because they cannot be candidates because they are suspended from the team) or that every voter has the right to write-in a player on his ballot that is not on the watch list. The guy needs to get some smarts somewhere. A lot of smarts. Probably not gonna happen.

Anyway, here is the eligibility and voting criteria page from biletnikoffaward.com:

Candidate Eligibility & Voting Criteria:

1. The Biletnikoff Award candidate must be an active collegiate receiver (any player who receives a thrown pass) at an NCAA Division 1 (FBS) institution.

2. He must not have been declared to be ineligible to participate in Division l (FBS) football by the NCAA at the time of any vote of the Biletnikoff Award’s National Selection Committee.

3. He must not have been declared to be ineligible to participate in Division l (FBS) football by the candidate’s institution at the time of any vote of the Biletnikoff Award’s National Selection Committee.

4. He must display leadership and self-discipline; and he must have a significant, positive impact on his team’s success.

5. He must display a commitment to be the best player he can be.

In addition, other relevant factors and procedures (such as the ones identified below) may be considered by voters during the selection process.

1. Any voter may write in any receiver not provided on the Foundation ballot through the vote for the three finalists. There is a designated space on the ballot for writing in candidates.

2. A voter may consider the quality of the candidate’s opposing teams.

The Foundation, when appropriate, will add receivers to the Biletnikoff Award Watch List (based upon performance and criteria as outlined on the website) without prejudice up to the commencement of voting by the Biletnikoff Award National Selection Committee.

All voters for the Biletnikoff Award consist of esteemed sports writers and commentators who cover college football on a national, regional, or conference level, past award winners of the Biletnikoff Award, and distinguished receivers of the past.

The Fan Vote posted on the website (equivalent to a vote of only one national selection committee member) will count as one additional vote during each voting period for the semifinalists, finalists, and winner. The Foundation does not reveal the vote of any individual selection committee member; however, any selection committee member may reveal his own vote.

All votes will be submitted electronically via a secure online ballot voting system supervised by a prominent CPA firm.

Looks like Friedlander has run out of column ideas so he expresses rage at a terrible, most terrible, most terrible act ever of leaving Hardy off the semifinalist list by voters, many of whom are, unlike Frieds, known and respected nationally. Talk about journalistic envy! This is no knock on Hardy, who is a really good receiver. But, ECU fans, c'mon! You are being used here.

Now, a short look at Sammy Batten, beat writer for ECU and the cheating UNC Tar Heels. Sammy is also pissed. Greatest outrage in the history of college sports ==leaving Justin Hardy off the semi list.

Well, Sammy is a beat writer at the school--UNC- that has cheated the most and longest in NCAA history--3000 fake classes involving 1500 athlete enrollments in 5 departments going back to include years of Dean Smith. 500 grade changes. Perhaps every soccer, football, and men's and women's basketball game over the period from 1992 to 2009 was played with several ineligible players. Vacate and forfeit time, anyone? Well, to the general sporting public and non-UNC fans that is an outrage. Maybe the greatest outrage in NCAA history. Certainly the mother of all cheating schemes.

Where has Sammy been? Haven't read any article by beat writer Sammy calling for the truth and calling out the incredibly obvious lies by Roy Williams and the rest. Calling for championships gained by massive cheating to be vacated.

Sammy couldn't recognize a real outrage. This manufactured outrage about Hardy? Well, Sammy sure spotted that one. LOL.LaughCool

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November 21, 2014
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cheerleader111 said
Welcome to the board, Jim Newman.

Seems like a few ECU fanboys are angry that the excellent receiver Justin Hardy was not selected by the Biletnikoff Award National Selection Committee as one of the 10 semifinalists.

Let's look at this issue.

First, I find it amusing that a couple of sportswriters are so outraged at the Foundation (Biletnikoff Award), when the Foundation does not vote.

There are 265 voters on the selection committee. Take a look at the voter list at biletnikoffaward.com web site. This is a great list (second only to the Heisman in quality) with a ton of great commentators and journalists with a smattering of former outstanding receivers. Balanced geographically. Lots of very smart people.

Now, take a look at who made the semifinalists list:

Nelson Agholor (USC): 82 catches, 1,079 yards, 13.2 ypc, 10 TDs
Amari Cooper (Alabama): 87 catches, 1,303 yards*,15 ypc, 11 TDs
Rashad Greene (Florida State): 75 catches, 1,042 yards, 13.9 ypc, 5 TDs
Rashard Higgins (Colorado State): 67 catches, 1,280 yards,19.1 ypc, 13 TDs*
Tyler Lockett (K-State): 60 catches, 878 yards,14.6 ypc, 6 TDs
Vince Mayle (Washington State): 86 catches, 1,152 yards,13.4 ypc, 9 TDs
Sterling Shepard (Oklahoma): 50 catches, 957 yards, 19.1 ypc, 5 TDs
Nelson Spruce (Colorado): 99 catches*, 1,091 yards,11 ypc, 11 TDs
Jaelen Strong (Arizona State): 71 catches, 982 yards,13.8 ypc, 9 TDs
Kevin White (West Virginia): 91 catches, 1,207 yards,13.3 ypc, 8 TDs

*Denotes FBS leader

Who of the 10 is Justin Hardy clearly better than?

Hardy would be behind everybody but Spruce in yards per catch. Hardy had 12.4 ypc. Spruce has 11 ypc, but Spruce had 11 TDs to Hardy's 7 TDs. Spruce caught 99 passes, the leading total in D1 (FBS). Hardy caught 80.

And look at Strength of Schedule (one of criteria on the Biletnikoff Award web site under voting criteria). Colorado plays the 26th toughest schedule in college football. East Carolina? Not so much. Only the 88th!!

Just who is Hardy clearly better than on the semifinalist list? Nobody. Not clearly. Not even just better. I mean to be outraged there has to be some monumental injustice, right?

The award is not a career award. It is the outstanding receiver of that year.

 Let's look further.

Hardy is barely ahead in receiving yardage of only Jaelen Strong, Sterling Shepard, and Tyler Lockett of the ten. But, Strong has a better ypc (13.8--12.4) and 9 TDs. And Arizona State has the 27th toughest schedule in the country to ECU's 88th. Good Lord!

Shepard has a 19.1 ypc average; he smokes Hardy's 12.4 ypc! And he plays for Oklahoma which has the 12th toughest schedule in college football.

Lockett has a 14.6 ypc average, over 2 yards a catch higher than Hardy's. Hardy has 1 more TD. But, Lockett plays the 35th toughest schedule in college football.

Hardy, like Lippett  and a few other receivers not on the semifinalist list, is an excellent receiver. Another year, maybe Hardy and Lippett both make the semifinalists. I like them both; they are terrific receivers and seemingly good guys. Just not this year. Too many great receivers this year!

Bottom line: Hardy is most certainly NOT clearly better or even just better that any of the ten receivers who made the semifinalist list!

Receiving Yards Leaders - All Players as of November 21

RK PLAYER TEAM REC YDS AVG LONG TD
1 Amari Cooper, WR* ALA 87 1303 15.0 80 11
2 Rashard Higgins, WR* CSU 67 1280 19.1 73 13
3 Kevin White, WR* WVU 98 1270 13.0 68 9
4 Tajae Sharpe, WR UMASS 81 1245 15.4 77 5
5 Vince Mayle, WR* WSU 86 1152 13.4 90 9
6 Joshua McCain, WR IDHO 73 1123 15.4 75 9
7 Nelson Spruce, WR* COLO 99 1091 11.0 71 11
8 Nelson Agholor, WR* USC 82 1079 13.2 87 10
9 Tyler Lockett, WR* KSU 70 1074 15.3 70 6
10 Corey Davis, WR WMU 56 1069 19.1 75 9
RK PLAYER TEAM REC YDS AVG LONG TD
11 Rashad Greene, WR* FSU 75 1042 13.9 74 5
12 Keevan Lucas, WR TLSA 81 1037 12.8 84 11
13 Justin Hardy, WR ECU 80 1002 12.5 38 7
14 Tony Lippett, WR MSU 51 999 19.6 71 9
15 Jaelen Strong, WR* ASU 71 982 13.8 77 9
16 John Harris, WR TEX 59 976 16.5 68 7
17 Sterling Shepard, WR* OKLA 50 957 19.1 75 5
18 Tyler Boyd, WR PITT 57 951 16.7 53 6
19 Leonte Carroo, WR RUTG 46 933 20.3 78 8
20 David Frazier, WR M-OH 54 901 16.7 74 5
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November 23, 2014
2:31 pm
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Clueless Friedlander and Batten Continue their Obsessive-Compulsive Harangue re Justin Hardy. Clue: The Biletnikoff Award is a Season Award, Not a Career Award--- the Outstanding Receiver for any YEAR! And Strength of Schedule (SOS) Is a Selection Criterion
 
 
 
Friedlander in his November 23 column:

 

GREENVILLE – A lot of things could have gone through Justin Hardy’s mind once he wrapped his hands around the 350th catch of his East Carolina football career Saturday, making him the most prolific receiver in FBS history.

He could have thought about his late father or the obstacles he had to overcome as a former walkon. He could have thought about the message his accomplishment sent to the Biletnikoff Award voters who earlier this week failed to select him as one of the nation’s top 10 receivers.

"Or he could simply have savored the moment and soaked up the adulation as his teammates congratulated him and an appreciative Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium crowd chanted his name.....

                                                 *****************************************

 

 

 

Sammy "I knew or asked nothing about UNC's the greatest cheating in NCAA history although I am also the UNC beat writer" Batten's November 23 column:

 

Lost in the euphoria surrounding the record was the surprising omission earlier in the week of Hardy on the list of 10 semifinalists for the Biletnikoff Award. The Biletnikoff is given annually to the nation's top college receiver.

"It is what it is,'' Hardy said when asked about the snub after Saturday's game. "Those people have their opinion.''

The normally jovial McNeill, however, was very irritated by the slight and told anyone who would listen in the media throughout the week. Even American Athletic Conference commissioner Mike Aresco stated his disappointment in an official league release.

Hardy may not be a Biletnikoff semifinalist, but he will be represented in the College Football Hall of Fame shortly. The ball he caught to break the record and his game jersey will soon be headed to Atlanta for display in the Hall.

So, they can deny Justin Hardy a spot on the Biletnikoff semifinal list, but no one can deny he's one of the best receivers in college football history. ....

                                                      ********************************

 

                                          Bumbling Brothers Friedlander and Batten

 

 

So these bumbling brothers of a different mother, still slamming the Biletnikoff Award's 265 distinguished voters, recognized by many as one of the very best selection committees in college sports, still cannot answer the material  questions:

1. If not voting Hardy on the 10 BA semifinalists list is such an outrage, I mean the worst thing ever in sports, just who among the 10 BA semifinalists did Hardy have a clearly better or just a better receiving year in 2014 than? Cause if Hardy is not clearly better than one, then there is no omission. No genuine outrage, but, rather, a manufactured outrage.
2. Did you know that Strength of Schedule is set out as a criterion for voters on the Biletnikoff Award web site and is actually used by voters and that Justin's team's SOS is a pathetic 95th?
 
(Frieds obviously does not read the criteria even though he brags he is a BA voter-- apparently he likes the prestige of association with perhaps the 3rd most prestigious individual college football award after the Heisman-- --he screamed about Sammy Watkins not being on the BA watch list in 2012 even though the clearly set out on web site BA criteria indicate that no player suspended by his school can be a BA candidate. And he blustered that he would have to rectify that injustice by writing in Watkins' name if only the rules allowed it. What? The BA rules do indeed allow any voter to write in a name).
 
Clue flash: Frieds and Sammy, the BA is a season award, not a career award, and the schedule you play (SOS) does affect a player's stats and, hence, standing with the BA's 265 voters.
 
So the fine receiver Justin Hardy's line: 89 catches for 1106 yards with only a 12.4 yards per catch average and 7 TDs., with a very poor Strength of Schedule (SOS) of 95. Yes, 100-5=95. Not 5. Not 9. 95!
 
 
Compare Justin's fine year of 2014 with the 2014 10 BA semifinalists--and everyone knows Justin is a terrific receiver. Problem in 2014 is that a ton of receivers had outstanding 2014 seasons. Which of the 10 BA Semifinalists did Justin Hardy have a clearly better or a just better 2014 season than??
 
**Clearly better or just better than Amari Cooper with 90 catches 11 TDs and a 1349 yards and a 15 yard per catch with a Strength of Schedule of  #5? Nope.
**Clearly better or just better than Rashard Higgins with 77 catches 1447 yards with a 18.8 ypc average and 15 TDs and a similarly poor SOS to Hardy but a  much higher Strength of Season Record rank of #21? Nope.
**Clearly better or just better than Kevin White's 98 catches 1270 yards 13 ypc and 9 TDs with a #6 SOS? Nope.
**Clearly better than or just better than Nelson Agholor's 85 catches 1103 yards 13 ypc 10 TDs and a SOS of #25th? Nope.
**Clearly better or just better than Vince Mahle with 101 catches  1404 yards 13.9 ypc and 9 TDs with a SOS of #18? Nope.
**Clearly better or just better than Nelson Spruce's 101 catches 1107 yards 11 ypc 11 TDs and a SOS of #19? Nope.
**Clearly better than or just better than Jaelen Strong's 71 catches 982 yards 13.8ypc 9 TDs and a SOS of #40, but a SOSR of #13. Nope.
**Clearly better than or just better than Tyler Lockett"s    70 catches  1074 yards  15.3 yards per catch 6 TDs playing college footballs 26th toughest (SOS) schedule. Nope.
**Clearly better or just better that Rashad Greene's  83 catches  1148 yards  13.8 ypc 5 TDs, with a SOS of 49th and a SOSR of #2. Nope.
**Clearly better than or just better than  Sterling Shepard's 50 catches 957 yards 19.1 yards per catch 5 TDs with a #16 SOS? Nope.
 
Shepard and Higgins appear as the most efficient receivers in the top 20---they provide big yards and high YPCs without needing to catch as many passes.
 
Any way you measure 2014 season performances, Justin had a fine year, just not clearly better than the 10 BA Semifinalists OR even just better that the ten. In fact, in every case relating to the 10 semifinalists' 2014 season performances, in fact Justin's 2014 season performance does not even equal any one of the 10 semifinalists..
 
Conclusion : False, manufactured outrage by a couple sportswriters (bet almost all the few were local beat writers , hugely invested in Justin and probably naturally and extremely biased as a result, who criticized without doing their homework and looking at the BA voter criteria. And never could tell their readers just who should Justin be ahead of on the 10 Semifinalist list for the BA for season performance in 2014!
 
Now, compare Justin to other excellent receivers who were not selected BA Semifinalists despite fine 2014 season performances:
 
And we haven't even looked at those receivers who also missed being selected by the 265 BA voters as BA semifinalists:  Tajae Sharpe  (81 catches  1245 yards  15.4 ypc  5 TDs); Corey Davis (65 catches  1173 yards   18 ypc 11 Tds); Keevan Lucas (95 catches  1134 yards   11.9 ypc  11 TDs); Joshua McCain (73 catches 1123 yards  15.4 ypc  9 TDs); Tyler Boyd (64 catches 1077 yards  16.8 ypc 7 TDs); and Tony Lippett (56 catches 1071 yards  19.1 ypc 10 TDs).
These performances in 2014 were as good as or better than Hardy's in many categories.
 
What of the SOSs of this group of 6 that missed selection as semifinalists in comparison to Justin Hardy's??In close selection cases between Receiver X and Receiver Y, voters might sometimes use that metric to separate performances.
 
Let's see:
***Tajae Sharpe's team has an SOS of 117 to Hardy's (SOS) 95, but Sharpe's stats were better or equal to Hardy: 1245 yards and a glossy ypc of 15.4
 
***Corey Davis' team has a 127 SOS,  but his stats are better than Hardy's in yards, 18 ypc (huge difference of 5.6 yards better per catch) and 11 TDs, 4 better than         Hardy.
***Keevan  Lucas's team  has a SOS of 74 (less than Hardy's 95), and bested Hardy in TDs 11 to Hardy's 7; Lucas had more yardage and averaged 1/2 yard less in his ypc).
***Joshua McCain's team has a SOS of 121, but had more TDs than Hardy 9 to 7; McCain had  more yards and a much better ypc aveage of  15.4.
 
Tyler Boyd's team has a SOS of 64 and was 44 yards in receiving behind Hardy, but he had as many TDs (7) but a much superior ypc of 16.8 yards.
 
Tony Lippett's team played the 57th most difficult schedule and had spectacular usage stats for efficiency: On only 54 catches, he had 1071 yards with a phenomenal 19.1 yards per catch and 10 TDs.
 
Objective analysis shows that Hardy's 2014 performance was not clearly or even just just better than any BA 2014 Semifinalist. In fact Hardy's 2014 performance was not even equal to any semifinalist.
 
It is clear, however, that Lippett, Boyd, McCain, Davis, and Sharpe were as good as or better in 2014 than Hardy.
I would call Lucas a tie.
 
It is apparent that the only outrage re the very fine receiver Hardy was entirely manufactured by some super fans of ECU and a few beat writers trying to attract ECU fans to their columns---all who were painfully averse to a comprehensive analysis of BA criteria and  the 2014 season performances.
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November 25, 2014
10:18 am
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Justin is a fine receiver, but his 2014 season does not equal the 10 semifinalists or even other receivers who did not make the semifinalist list.

I like the approach of other posters: Which semifinalist's 2014 record is Justin's 2014 record clearly or just merely better than? Those 10 are pretty outstanding in catches, yards, ypcs, TDs and SOSs. Until that is answered, there is no mistake by the distinguished 265 voters.
 
Have you seen the records of about 6 others who did not make the 10 semifinalists? Tajae Sharpe?  Joshua McCain?  Corey Davis? Keevan Lucas?  They all had SOSs about like ECU's but mostly superior 2014 season stats and they did not make the 10SFs..  (3 more in YPC than Justin; all in yards; 3 in TDs) .
 
Or Tony Lippett? Or Tyler Boyd? These two had much better SOSs; and Lippett had 10 TDs and 19.1 ypc (to JH's 12.4 ypc--lower by far than any but 1 of the semifinalists-- and 7 TDs). Lippett only had to catch the ball a highly efficient 56 times to JH's 89 and yet had only 40 yards less and 3 TDs more, and nearly 7 yards a catch more! 
 
Tyler Boyd was similar to Lippett's efficiency and had  64 catches for 40 yards less and a 16.8 ypc and the same as Justin's TDs--- --7. Is Hardy's 2014 season better than Lippett's or Boyd's (both with measurably better SOSs) or better than the 4 receivers above who did not make the SFs?
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