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North Carolina (UNC) Cheating Scandal. UNC Is the biggest cheater of all-time. 20 years of 3000 fake classes, 500 unauthorized grade changes. 100s of players who cannot do college work. Businessweek,
October 15, 2014
2:02 pm
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keggythekeg
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Four outdoor billboards near Mebane, NC. This is one:

 

UNC Athletic Scandal


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October 15, 2014
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Another billboard: for over 20 years the corrupt UNC African-American Studies Dept. has offered over 300 fake classes and made 500 unauthorized grade changes to keep 100s of rather stupid UNC athletes eligible in basketball and football. The truth is in the transcripts.

 


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October 15, 2014
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October 16, 2014
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Tarnished Heels is an illuminating book. UNC fans will hate it because it exposes the systemic fraud and cheating at UNC over the last 23 years to be the greatest cheating by any school in NCAA history. The NCAA is absolutely gutless if it does not strip the 1993, 2005, and 2009 NCAA basketball championships because many UNC players were staying eligible only through fake classes' grades.

From the Inside Flap of Tarnished Heel:

"Fantastic and illuminating read. This book is ultimately a modern day
 
tragedy in that it exposes, with excruciating detail and facts, how one of America's
 
best public institutions sold its soul for the perceived benefits of athletic glory at the
 
expense of core values and academic integrity. Despite years of claiming the
 
Carolina Way and doing it right, the University of North Carolina, like so many
 
other institutions before it, has now firmly placed itself amongst the worst offenders
 
of academic integrity in intercollegiate athletic history."
 
- Dr. B. David Ridpath, Ed.D., Kahandas Nandola Professor of Sport
 
Management at Ohio University and author of "Tainted Glory: Marshall
 
University, The NCAA, and One Man's Fight for Justice"
 
------
 
 
 
"Tarnished Heels" documents the efforts to uncover the facts of the worst
 
combined academic and athletic scandal in the history of the University of North
 
Carolina, America's first public university. It is a sad tale of expensive and
 
ineffective efforts at "spin" control preventing the UNC administration from
 
admitting and correcting clear wrongdoing at an early stage in its now four­-year
 
effort. The book shows that despite specific, repeated urging of both the Chairman
 
of the UNC-­Chapel Hill Trustees and the Chairman of the Consolidated University
 
System's Board of Governors to be quickly forthcoming and transparent, the
 
administration repeatedly withheld facts until ordered by a court to disclose them or
 
they were exposed by the investigative reporting of several news agencies.
 
"Tarnished Heels" reviews clear, and to date uncontroverted, evidence of 
 
many fraudulent no-­show "classes" by faculty with the direct involvement of staff,
 
athletic academic advisors to players, tutors and others. It is a sad story for those
 
of us who received degrees from and truly love this great university. It is a
 
reminder of the danger of "big time" athletics corrupting a university's academic
 
mission and demonstrates the vital role of investigative reporting and a free press
 
in America.
 
- Burley Mitchell, Retired Chief Justice of North Carolina, President, UNC
 
Law Class of 1969
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October 20, 2014
3:24 pm
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Wainstein report out Wednesday. Wainstein was hired by UNCHEATs to clean the stables. He reps white collar criminals; hence, UNC hired him. UNC is paying him $800 an hour.

Dan Kane is on the story.

http://www.newsobserver.com/20.....#038;ihp=1

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October 22, 2014
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Dan Kane at work, demolishing the continuing lies of UNC and its million $$$ PR team, with 14 staffers trying to spin for the UNCHeats: http://www.newsobserver.com/20.....&rh=1
 
And, 10 questions about the cheating system which the hired white collar defense lawyer (at $1000 an hour) Wainstein needs to answer in his "independent" ([Image Can Not Be Found]) report. No matter how awesome the whitewash here, the matter of the enormity of the UNC cheating for over 20 years (yep, old Deano was in the middle of it and he was the biggest supporter of the corrupt Afro African American Studies' being established as a department) will drive continued reporting.
 
Were UNC 'no-show' classes designed to avoid independent studies limits?

By Dan Kane

dkane@newsobserver.comOctober 21, 2014 Updated 24 hours ago
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UNCWAINSTEIN2-NE-062014-HLL

Ken Wainstein, former top U.S. Justice Department official gives a status update Friday, June 20, 2014 to the UNC Board of Governors on his investigation into the academic fraud at UNC-Chapel Hill. HARRY LYNCH — hlynch@newsobserver.com |Buy Photo

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LinkMore stories, profiles, documents and background on the UNC scandal
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UNC academic fraud report to be released Wednesday

10 key questions

After eight months of investigation, attorney Kenneth Wainstein, a former U.S. Homeland Security adviser and top Justice Department official, is expected to release his findings Wednesday into the long-running academic fraud at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Wainstein’s probe is the third investigation led or backed by UNC tasked with finding out what went wrong. Here are 10 key questions in the case:

1 When did it begin?

Gov. Jim Martin’s report pegged the fraudulent classes to the fall of 1997, though some evidence suggested they started in 1994. But Martin did not talk with Julius Nyang’oro, former chair of the African studies department or Deborah Crowder; their cooperation with Wainstein might pinpoint when the classes started.

2 Why did it begin?

Martin said some classes may have resulted from Crowder's desire to help anyone in need of a class. He also suggested Nyang’oro used the classes to boost enrollments in his department, which could lead to more staff and resources. But one UNC email suggested Crowder was concerned the classes had gotten into the “frat circuit,” which indicates she didn’t want everyone to have access.

3 Who else knew?

Numerous emails show counselors in the tutoring program for athletes knew the classes didn’t meet, only required a paper and weren’t challenging. Another document indicated a Swahili professor knew about them in asking that a football player be placed in a “paper” class. Whistleblower Mary Willingham, a former learning specialist in the tutoring program, said it was common knowledge within the program that the classes were being used to keep academically challenged athletes eligible to play sports.

4 Did athletic officials raise questions about the no-show classes, and if so, to whom?

Athletic officials told Martin that after an independent study scandal at Auburn University in 2006, they had raised questions about the AFAM classes to the Faculty Committee on Athletics. But no documentation supports the claim, and Martin cited only one member of the committee – Jack Evans, then UNC’s faculty representative to the NCAA – who recalled such concerns. Martin later had to retract the finding.

5 Had the university admitted athletes who struggled to do college-level work?

Willingham said her review of testing data found more than 120 athletes over an eight-year-period who could not read at a high-school level. University officials and experts they hired dismissed her research as seriously flawed and said it overestimated the number of athletes who had trouble doing college-level work. Academic records independently obtained by the N&O suggested athletes with subpar academic abilities were being admitted, and needed heavy tutoring.

6 Why were so many athletes taking Swahili?

Eighteen Swahili language classes were identified as no-show classes. Other records show athletes paying little attention in Swahili classes that did meet.

7 Is it an athletic scandal?

Martin and UNC officials have said no, because all students had access to the classes and received the same high grades. But earlier this year, UNC officials began acknowledging the disproportionate numbers of athletes enrolled needed further explanation. In June, ESPN and the N&O reported high numbers of no-show classes and independent studies among members of the 2005 men’s basketball team. Later that month, UNC announced the NCAA had reopened its investigation.

8 Were tutors writing papers for athletes?

Rashad McCants, a star of the 2005 men’s basketball team, made this claim on ESPN. Other evidence has raised questions about tutors overstepping their roles in helping athletes.

9 What drove the hundreds of grade changes in these classes?

Martin’s report found 560 suspicious grade changes. Some may have been as innocuous as a student turning in a paper late due to sickness; others might involve something more nefarious.

10 Did the scandal go beyond the no-show classes in the African studies department?

Transcripts and other records show athletes often enrolled in the same classes, suggesting the goal was to keep them eligible, not to help them pursue a degree that best fit their abilities and interests.

Since at least the early 1990s, UNC-Chapel Hill sought to limit the number of “special studies” undergraduate students could take toward their degrees. The limit was the equivalent of four such classes – a small minority of the courses needed for graduation.

Those classes usually meant independent studies, which involved meetings with a professor, required reading, and a paper due at the end.

But a second type of independent study evolved into a scandal at UNC: classes in the former African and Afro-American studies department advertised as lectures that never met and required only a paper at the end. More details that have emerged about the no-show classes provide evidence that several athletes in men’s basketball and football had taken far more of the two types of independent study classes than the rules would allow.

As Kenneth Wainstein prepares to deliver the results of the latest investigation into the scandal on Wednesday, the heavy use in no-show classes by athletes raises a key question: Were they created to help athletes – and perhaps other students – get around the four-class limit?

Five members of the 2005 championship basketball team accounted for at least 52 classes that were either accurately characterized as independent study or were identified as confirmed or suspected no-show classes, according to enrollment data provided by Mary Willlingham, a former learning specialist for UNC athletes who became a whistleblower. That averages out to 10 classes per athlete.

Meanwhile, a transcript for Julius Peppers, who played football and basketball at UNC until 2001, listed nine independent studies or no-show classes.

Richard Cramer was a longtime sociology professor and spent six years as associate dean for UNC’s College of Arts & Sciences. One of his jobs for the college for the past dozen years as a part-time employee included checking the transcripts of students close to graduation to make sure they had met various academic requirements.

That included checking the number of independent studies taken. But he said the no-show classes at the heart of the academic scandal would have escaped detection because they looked like lecture-style classes.

“We wouldn’t know,” said Cramer, who retired last summer after his position was cut. “We wouldn’t ask unless somebody told us.”

UNC officials have declined to explain the independent studies limit, other than noting it was in a report the university produced in the wake of the scandal. That 2012 report, however, did not identify a problem with independent studies within the AFAM department exceeding enrollment limits. The News & Observer first cited the limit in a June article about the 2005 men’s basketball team.

Joel Curran, a UNC spokesman, said Monday that he expects Wainstein to address questions about independent studies in his report. Wainstein said he could not comment on the independent studies limit or his report until Wednesday.

Why independent study?

The university’s undergraduate bulletins, which explain the university’s academic requirements to students, weren’t a model of clarity when it came to independent studies.

For many years, the bulletins identified them as “correspondence courses” that on-campus students couldn’t take without a dean’s approval. They could be taken at any time, and students had up to nine months to complete them. Academically ineligible students were encouraged to take them, and could take up to 30 credit hours.

During those years, the four-class limit was on “special studies.” They weren’t specifically called independent studies until the start of the 2006-07 academic year. Since that time, the correspondence courses have been referred to as “self-paced” courses.

Higher education experts outside of UNC say limits on the number of independent studies students can take aren’t surprising. But the reasons for them vary.

Jason Johnson, an education professor and associate dean for undergraduate affairs at the University of Washington, said most universities aren’t worried about students abusing independent studies. They are more concerned about making sure students graduate on time. Students enrolling in too many independent studies could lengthen their stays by not fulfilling core requirements that reflect the university’s commitment to providing a well-rounded education.

“Universities are always very concerned about a student’s academic progress and their movement through the curriculum,” Johnson said.

Independent studies risks

There’s another financial incentive to limit independent studies: They are among the most expensive a college can offer, because they represent a 1-to-1 student-to-professor ratio, as opposed to a professor teaching 20 or more students in a classroom.

Two independent studies scandals over the past decade at the University of Michigan and Auburn University have alerted colleges to the potential for abuse.

In both cases, professors were offering scores of independent studies to students within an academic year. Athletes were big beneficiaries, but neither case drew substantial NCAA involvement because nonathletes were also in the classes.

“This is an area that by the very nature of it is prone to abuse,” said Jordan Kurland, associate general secretary of the American Association of University Professors. “Also by the very nature of it, it could be the most meaningful learning experience, and you’ve got to watch both ends of it.”

Auburn’s scandal drew the attention of UNC faculty in 2006, leading the Faculty Council to ask the university’s Faculty Committee on Athletics to check for signs of independent studies abuse.

At that time, the African studies department was offering far more independent studies than its faculty could manage. Shortly after, the number of independent studies in the department dropped significantly.

But that drop didn’t become known until years later, in the wake of the scandal. It is not clear why. Meanwhile, the no-show classes continued until 2011, though they dropped off after the African studies department’s longtime manager, Deborah Crowder, retired in 2009.

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/10/21/4250913_were-unc-no-show-classes-designed.html?sp=/99/100/&rh=1#storylink=cpy

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October 22, 2014
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Wainstein report, attempted whitewash, is out: Incredibly damning even as it could have revealed more: unc.edu/spotlight/wainsteins-r...asses-released/

 Tweet from ESPN's Between the Lines host Bob Ley:

 

"Roy Williams' frmr academic advsr tells investigators he knew classes were fraudulent at the time, but doesn't recall whether informed coach"

 
Really? Amazing!
 

Under Roy Williams, 167 men's bball players took (my insert: fraudulent) AFAM ind studies at some point. Under Doherty, 42, under Guthridge, 17, under Smith, 54.

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October 22, 2014
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bigten_numberone said

Wainstein report, attempted whitewash, is out: Incredibly damning even as it could have revealed more: unc.edu/spotlight/wainsteins-r...asses-released/

 Tweet from ESPN's Between the Lines host Bob Ley:

 
"Roy Williams' frmr academic advsr tells investigators he knew classes were fraudulent at the time, but doesn't recall whether informed coach"

 

Really? Amazing!

 

Amanda Albright ‏@amanda_albright    13m 13 minutes ago
Under Roy Williams, 167 men's bball players took (my insert: fraudulent) AFAM ind studies at some point. Under Doherty, 42, under Guthridge, 17, under Smith, 54.
Dan Kane: "The system of no-show classes at UNC-Chapel Hill was pushed by academic counselors for athletes, hatched and enabled by two sympathetic officials in a key department and employed by coaches eager to keep players eligible, a new report into the long-running scandal has found." 
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UNBELIEVABLE!!!

From the News & Observer:

Wainstein report: A do-gooder, plagiarism, grade changes, and a chilling powerpoint

October 22, 2014 Updated 1 hour ago
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These are excerpts from the report released Wednesday by Kenneth Wainstein on the academic scandal at UNC-Chapel Hill:

CROWDER THE ‘DO-GOODER’

Deborah “Crowder was known throughout campus as a ‘do-gooder’ who was always willing to help out a student who was struggling….Crowder was also passionate about Carolina athletics. Her affinity for Chapel Hill’s teams – and particularly the men’s basketball team – was well known. She kept the men’s basketball calendars on her office walls; her office was a regular gathering place for the players; and according to several faculty members, she cared so much about the fortunes of the basketball team that she was occasionally unable to come to work for a day or two after the Tar Heels lost a basketball game.”

NYANG’ORO AND ‘PROFESSOR DEBBY’

Julius “Nyang’oro’s administration of AFAM was more hands-off than his predecessors. While he sought to grow the Department and increase the number of faculty, he paid less attention to the curriculum and quality control. He also increasingly relied on Crowder to handle many tasks – such as scheduling courses, overseeing registration and approving enrollments – that would normally be handled or at least overseen by a faculty member or department chair. He also gave her approval to sign his name on Department paperwork, a delegation that Crowder used effectively to increase the scope of her personal authority. Over time, Crowder took on an outsize role in AFAM, which became recognized throughout campus, as students started referring to her as ‘Professor Debby.’”

NYANG’ORO: CALLED AN ‘ASS’ FOR DEMANDING TOO MUCH FROM STUDENTS

“Nyang’oro initially undertook to conduct all of his independent studies in accordance with the traditional format and requirements, demanding regular student meetings and updates on their paper progress. Over time, however, he began to get complaints directly from Crowder and indirectly from the ...academic counselors about demanding too much from the student-athletes and requiring too many meetings. On one occasion, Crowder told him that the ASPSA academic counselors believe he was ‘being an ass’ for demanding so much from the players and were rethinking whether they should be steering student-athletes to AFAM classes.”

CROWDER DEVISES SCHEME

“In light of that push-back from the (academic) counselors, Crowder took it upon herself to improvise with AFAM’s independent study classes. She did so by designing an irregular independent study class that essentially took the professor out of the picture – substituting herself for the professor and substituting her standards for those that traditionally apply to independent studies.”

NYANG’ORO’S SYMPATHY FOR ATHLETES

“[Nyang’oro] acquiesced, in part, because he was happy to cede decision-making authority to [Crowder], especially since his busy consulting and personal schedule kept him away from campus for long periods of time. Beyond his practical interest in delegating responsibilities to Crowder there was a more compassionate reason for Nyang’oro’s willingness to go along with Crowder’s irregular independent studies classes – he had developed his own sympathy for student-athletes and his own interest in helping them to remain eligible. According to Nyang’oro, he had taught two student-athletes early in his career who were later forced to leave the school because they had become academically ineligible. One of those student-athletes was murdered shortly after returning to his rural hometown; the other soon got in legal trouble and wound up in jail. When he learned about their fates, Nyang’oro committed himself to preventing such tragedies in the future and to helping other struggling students-athletes to stay in school.”

BIFURCATED CLASSES

“In addition to those lecture-designated paper classes, the AFAM Department also developed a hybrid model that we call the ‘bifurcated classes.’ the bifurcated classes were lecture classes in which some of the enrolled students were expected to attend regular lectures and complete all assignments like any other lecture course, while others were exempted from those standard class requirements and were allowed to complete the class by simply turning in a paper, pursuant to the typical paper class process.

“We found that some students were selected for paper-class treatment because they were considered behavior problems in the classroom, while other were selected simply because they were student-athletes.”

CLASSES HAD REPUTATION AMONG ATHLETES

“It was common knowledge among student-athletes that it was the norm to receive an A or B in the paper classes, regardless of the quality of their submitted papers – an understanding that was borne out by the fact that grades in the paper classes were 10 percent higher than those awarded in the regular AFAM courses.”

ACADEMIC COUNSELORS FOR ATHLETES STEERED ATHLETES TO CLASSES, DICTATED GRADES

“The academic counselors in ASPSA were well aware that these courses existed, that they required relatively little work and that they generally resulted in high grades. For those reasons, some counselors routinely steered their student-athletes into these classes. They would identify those student-athletes who needed extra help to maintain their eligibility, steer those student-athletes toward the paper classes and then work closely with Crowder to register them. In football, for example, ASPSA Associate Director Cynthia Reynolds (‘Reynolds’) and her staff sent Crowder lists of players to be enrolled in paper classes each term, and in some cases apparently even indicated for Crowder the grade or grade range the player would need to earn in the class to maintain eligibility. In men’s basketball, academic counselor Burgess McSwain (’McSwain’) and her successor Wayne Walden routinely called Crowder to arrange classes for their players.”

PLAGIARISM

“There were instances in which students and student-athletes prepared papers that were largely ‘cut and paste’ jobs that simply copies text from publicly available sources. Knowing that Crowder graded the papers and that she gave them only a light skim before assigning a grade, many paper class students and student-athletes would submit a paper with quality text in the introduction and conclusion and nothing but ‘fluff’ or largely unoriginal material in between.”

INAPPROPRIATE HELP FROM TUTORS

“There were certain ASPSA tutors who crossed that line in assisting student-athletes with their papers for the paper classes. One example was a tutor for the football players, Jennifer Wiley. She started out on the right side of that line, helping to guide the players in the formulation of their papers without doing any drafting for them. After struggling with the challenged writing proficiency of many players, she eventually found herself actually drafting sections of papers for several of the struggling players.”

ASSOCIATE DEAN REDUCES, BUT DOES NOT STOP, INDEPENDENT STUDY CLASSES

“The only other questions about the AFAM classes were raised by Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education Roberta ‘Bobbi’ Owen. In 2005 or 2006, Dean Owen had lunch with Nyang’oro and complained to him about the extremely high number of independent studies he was handling (sometimes more than 300 per academic year). She directed him to reduce that number and to ‘get [Crowder] under control,’ suggesting that Crowder was somehow behind the high numbers of independent studies in the AFAM Department. When Nyang’oro returned from lunch that day, he told Crowder that Owen was watching the independent studies enrollments and instructed her to scale them back. Crowder did as instructed, and the number of independent studies enrollments immediately went down. Owen noticed the decline in enrollments, and in November 2006 she sent Nyang’oro an email entitled ‘Ind Studies,’ noting that ‘it has gotten quieter from your side of campus,’ and conveying her thanks….She never asked what sort of instruction Nyang’oro was actually providing to those hundreds of independent studies students registered under his name each year….[B]y failing to follow up on her lunch-time admonition to Nyang’oro beyond her single email, Dean Owen missed the chance to put an end to these paper classes five years before their eventual discovery in 2011.”

CROWDER RETIREMENT PANICS ATHLETIC COUNSELORS

“In 2008, Crowder announced that she would retire the next year, and news of her impending retirement quickly spread throughout campus. Among the football counselors in ASPSA, there was a sobering recognition that Crowder’s retirement would mean an end to the courses they had relied upon to keep struggling student-athletes eligible. Those counselors quickly moved to mitigate the effect of this development. First, they urged all football players to submit their summer school papers in time to have them graded by Crowder. In one email to a football operations coordinator, Andre Williams, during the second summer session of 2009, Cynthia Reynolds, the Associate Director for ASPSA and Director of Football, wrote that ‘Ms. Crowder is retiring at the end of July … if the guys papers are not in … I would expect D’s or C’s at best. Most need to be better than that.”

A POWERPOINT PRESENTATION ON PAPER CLASSES

“In that meeting, Beth Bridger (’Bridger’) and Jaimie Lee (’Lee’) of the ASPSA football counseling staff explained (1) that the AFAM paper classes had played a large role in keeping under-prepared and/or unmotivated football player eligible to play and (2) that these classes no longer existed. To emphasize those points, the counselors used the following slide in their presentation to the football coaches:

‘What was part of the solution in the past?

‘* We put them in classes that met degree requirements in which

— They didn’t go to class

— They didn’t take notes, have to stay awake

— They didn’t have to meet with professors

— They didn’t have to pay attention or necessarily engage with the material

‘* AFAM/AFRI SEMINAR COURSES

— 20-25 page papers on course topic

— THESE NO LONGER EXIST!’”

FOOTBALL PLAYERS’ GRADES TUMBLE POST-CROWDER

“The Fall 2009 semester – the first in over a decade without Crowder and her paper classes, resulted in the lowest football team GPA in ten years – 2.121. Forty-eight players earned a semester GPA of less than 2.0.”

NYANG’ORO CONTINUES CROWDER CLASSES

“In total, Nyang’oro offered six classes after Crowder’s retirement that had the elements of Crowder’s ‘paper classes,’ except for her grading of the term papers. Two of these were paper classes like the ones Crowder had offered and one was an independent study paper class with 13 football athletes. The other three were what we have called ‘bifurcated classes,’ which were essentially two classes within a single class roll – one set of students that attended class and completed it the traditional way and another set of students who completed the course as a paper class. The vast majority of those completing a bifurcated class as a paper class were student-athletes.”

GRADE CHANGES IN LEGITIMATE CLASSES

“In Spring 2006, Professor Bereket Selassie taught a lecture class on North-East Africa, AFRI 124, with 25 enrolled students. At the end of the semester, Professor Selassie recorded a grade of AB (an incomplete grade that technically means ‘absent from the exam’) for a football player who never attended the lectures or the exam. When we asked Professor Selassie about this student, he was flabbergasted to see that the AB for that football player had been changed to an A- through a grade change form.

“We then interviewed both Crowder and the football player and learned that he was one of Crowder’s add-on students. She had place the football player on Professor Selassie’s class roll, give him a paper topic and graded his paper. Crowder changed the grade from an AB to an A- using a grade change form and signed Nyang’oro’s name as instructor.”

PURPOSE BEHIND PAPER CLASSES

“Unlike other classes, there was no pretense that these classes were intended in any meaningful way to educate students about the subject matter. It was clear to us that the overriding purpose of these classes was to serve as ‘GPA boosters’ (a term that tutor Jennifer Wiley said was used within ASPSA) that allowed students to remain in good academic and athletic standing.”

“The second distinguishing feature of these classes was the irrelevance of the quality of the student’s work to the grade awarded. Crowder admitted that she assigned high grades largely without paying attention to their quality, and Nyang’oro admitted that he similarly looked past the strength of the paper when he handled grading for the post-Crowder papers.”

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/10/22/4255107/wainstein-report-a-do-gooder-plagiarism.html?sp=/99/100/&ihp=1#storylink=cpy

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October 22, 2014
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From page 62 of the Wainstein Report:

"A total of 2,152 individual students who enrolled in the paper classes were included in this impact analysis. Of that number, 329 students (including 169 student-athletes) had at least one semester in which the grade they received in their paper class either pushed or kept their GPA above 2.0. In other words, for at least one semester in their college career, each of those students had an actual cumulative GPA above a 2.0 but a recalculated GPA (excluding the paper class grade(s)) below a 2.0. This number includes 123 football players, 15 men’s basketball players, eight women’s basketball players, and 26 Olympic sport athletes."

If those cited 15 basketball players didn't have a 2.0 GPR, then they were indeed not academically eligible to play. If they weren't academically eligible to play and indeed did play (which they did because no player was held out for academics in that time frame), the wins must be vacated and at least 2 NCAA championship banners removed.

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From page 62 of the Wainstein Report:

"A total of 2,152 individual students who enrolled in the paper classes were included in this impact analysis. Of that number, 329 students (including 169 student-athletes) had at least one semester in which the grade they received in their paper class either pushed or kept their GPA above 2.0. In other words, for at least one semester in their college career, each of those students had an actual cumulative GPA above a 2.0 but a recalculated GPA (excluding the paper class grade(s)) below a 2.0. This number includes 123 football players, 15 men’s basketball players, eight women’s basketball players, and 26 Olympic sport athletes."

As those 15 basketball players cited did not maintain a 2.0 GPR, they were not academically eligible to play. And, If they weren't academically eligible to play and still played (and we know they did because there were no academic suspensions of basketball players during the report's study),consistent with NCAA regulations the wins must be vacated and at least the 2005 and 2009 NCAA championship banners removed and those championships expunged from the records.

 
 
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federer_fan said

From page 62 of the Wainstein Report:
"A total of 2,152 individual students who enrolled in the paper classes were included in this impact analysis. Of that number, 329 students (including 169 student-athletes) had at least one semester in which the grade they received in their paper class either pushed or kept their GPA above 2.0. In other words, for at least one semester in their college career, each of those students had an actual cumulative GPA above a 2.0 but a recalculated GPA (excluding the paper class grade(s)) below a 2.0. This number includes 123 football players, 15 men’s basketball players, eight women’s basketball players, and 26 Olympic sport athletes."
As those 15 basketball players cited did not maintain a 2.0 GPR, they were not academically eligible to play. And, If they weren't academically eligible to play and still played (and we know they did because there were no academic suspensions of basketball players during the report's study),consistent with NCAA regulations the wins must be vacated and at least the 2005 and 2009 NCAA championship banners removed and those championships expunged from the records.

 

 

 photo unc_bball_frauds-_2-1.jpgImage Enlarger

And what of Wayne Walden, Roy Smith's right hand man at Kansas and UNC? From the report:

"In men’s basketball, academic counselor Burgess McSwain (“McSwain”) and her successor Wayne Walden routinely called Crowder to arrange classes for their players."

"Crowder saw the ASPSA counselors as full partners in her effort to make paper classes available to struggling student-athletes. She was personally close with a number of the counselors over the years, and had particularly strong relationships with men’s basketball counselors McSwain and Walden, football counselor Reynolds and women’s basketball counselor Jan Boxill. Crowder contended that there was a collaborative effort between her and these counselors to support the counselors’ athletes with these classes."

"In another email in March 2006, [Crowder] wrote to Wayne Walden about adding a student-athlete to a particular paper class, noting that she 'had added several non-athletic persons to classes this week so am comfortable adding him to it.'”

"Walden acknowledged knowing about irregular aspects of the paper classes, including that Crowder was doing at least some of the paper grading. When asked whether he shared this information with Coaches Holladay or Williams, he could not recall doing so."

"Crowder’s recollection is corroborated by an email in which she tells Wayne Walden that one of his players can take a Sahle lecture class without having to attend. In that email, she proposes AFRI 116, Sahle’s class, and says 'I have already spoken to the professor [Sahle] and she is aware he [the student-athlete] can not [sic] come because of the time and she will just give him an independent assignment. We can get by with 1 or 2 of those.'”

"It was not lost on anybody that Roy Williams was able to bring Walden in from Kansas, install him in ASPSA and have him supplant long-time counselor McSwain. Nor was it lost on the counselors that Reynolds was out of her job once Davis lost patience with her. It was quite clear to the counselors – at least those in the revenue sports – that they were being evaluated by the coaches and judged by their success in keeping players eligible to play ball."

 

Disgusting, man.

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Further destruction of Dean Smith's reputation:

"Matt Doherty is a former Tar Heel player who went on to coach at the University of Notre Dame before being recruited to Chapel Hill as head coach in 2000.  Doherty explained that upon assuming the coaching position, he inherited the academic support system developed by prior coaches Dean Smith and Bill Guthridge.  That system had academic oversight being handled by McSwain, the counselor with close ties to Debby Crowder.  While he felt free to make significant changes to the rest of the team's coaching and support staff, Doherty was told by Smith and Guthridge, who both had a continued presence on campus,, that he should not change the academic support system.  As a result, the McSwain-Crowder pipeline continued to operate, and there were 42 enrollments of men's basketball players in paper classes during Doherty's tenure."

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federer_fan said
Further destruction of Dean Smith's reputation:

"Matt Doherty is a former Tar Heel player who went on to coach at the University of Notre Dame before being recruited to Chapel Hill as head coach in 2000.  Doherty explained that upon assuming the coaching position, he inherited the academic support system developed by prior coaches Dean Smith and Bill Guthridge.  That system had academic oversight being handled by McSwain, the counselor with close ties to Debby Crowder.  While he felt free to make significant changes to the rest of the team's coaching and support staff, Doherty was told by Smith and Guthridge, who both had a continued presence on campus,, that he should not change the academic support system.  As a result, the McSwain-Crowder pipeline continued to operate, and there were 42 enrollments of men's basketball players in paper classes during Doherty's tenure."

MSN News: Business Insider
 
 

New Report Implicates UNC's Athletics Department In Fake Classes Scandal

Business Insider
pjacobs@businessinsider.com (Peter Jacobs) 6 hrs ago
 

BBaCZ3M.img?h=203&w=270&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=289&y=269Image Enlarger © Provided by Business Insider

The University of North Carolina Chapel Hill athletics department knew about and encouraged fake classes and grade manipulation for the school's athletes, according to a new report released Wednesday.

A previous report released in 2012 revealed a long history at UNC of classes in the Department of Afro and African-American Studies that never met, as well as a culture of changing and improving grades. These classes were heavily populated by student athletes.

The 2012 report cleared the UNC athletics department of any involvement in the athletes' grade inflation.

This no longer seems to be the case. According to The News & Observer, Wednesday's report "found a new culprit: the Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes ... The report describes a fairly broad group of academic and athletic officials who knew about athletes getting better grades in classes that only required papers, yet taking little or no action."

Additionally, student newspaper The Daily Tar Heel reports, the new report "found clear evidence that academic counselors from the football, men's basketball and women's basketball teams asked for players to be enrolled in bogus independent study classes in order for them to be eligible."

The more recent investigation was led by Kenneth Wainstein, a former U.S. Justice Department official. Wainstein reportedly had an unprecedented level of access to material related to the UNC scandal, as well as the cooperation of former African studies chairman Julius Nyang'oro and department administrator Deborah Crowder.

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BloombergBusinessWeek: Scandals

UNC Admits Fake Classes for Athletes Were Widespread: Four Blunt Points

http://www.businessweek.com/ar.....widespread

 

October 22, 2014

A North Carolina Tar Heels football game at Kenan Stadium in Chapel Hill, NCImage Enlarger

Photograph by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

A North Carolina Tar Heels football game at Kenan Stadium in Chapel Hill, NC

The University of North Carolina on Wednesday admitted its academic-fraud-for-athletes scandal was worse than the public has previously been told. That’s saying something. After all, the practice at Chapel Hill of steering football and basketball players into fake classes had already made North Carolina the epicenter of a national debate about the corrupting effects of the $16 billion college athletics industry. Four blunt points:

1. The deceit was widespread and aimed at keeping athletes eligible. For years, UNC officials have resisted the obvious indications that academics were compromised to promote sports. That resistance has finally collapsed. The latest in a series of university-sponsored investigations revealed that over 18 years—from 1993 through 2011—some 3,100 students took “paper classes” with no faculty oversight and no actual class attendance. Almost half the students enrolled in the phony courses were athletes. Many of the basketball and football players “were directed to the classes by academic counselors” assigned to advise athletes, UNC said in a written statement. “These counselors saw the paper classes and the artificially high grades they yielded as key to helping some student-athletes remain eligible.”

In other words, to keep members of UNC’s top-rated basketball team on the court, professional “counselors” encouraged flat-out academic fraud.

2. Of all disciplines, it was black studies that hosted the fake classes. Kenneth Wainstein, the former federal prosecutor who led the latest investigation, found that the department formerly known as African & Afro-American Studies offered hundreds of “irregular classes.” Wainstein, now in private practice, said that two people formerly in the department—the ex-chairman, Julius Nyang’oro, and his top administrative aide, Deborah Crowder—oversaw the paper classes. “Various university personnel were aware of red flags,” UNC said, “yet did not ask questions. There was a failure of meaningful oversight by the university.”

Wainstein didn’t find wrongdoing outside the black studies department. “No current coaches were involved or aware,” the university added.

The corruption of African American studies is particularly offensive, as UNC’s elite athletic ranks are disproportionately African American: black students, many of them from modest economic backgrounds, who provide athletic services in exchange for the promise of a college education. That’s supposed to be a real education, not one built on no-show classes.

3. UNC is sorry. “I apologize first to the students who entrusted us with their education and took these courses,” said UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol Folt. “Mr. Wainstein has found that the wrongdoing at Carolina lasted much longer and affected more students than previously known. The bad actions of a few and the inaction of others failed the university’s students, faculty and alumni, and undermined the institution as a whole.” Folt, who became chancellor in in 2013, promised a variety of academic reforms and said that nine (unspecified) UNC employees would be fired or disciplined. “Others implicated in the [Wainstein] report include former university employees,” such as Nyang’oro and Crowder, the university said.

4. Questions remain. The National Collegiate Athletic Association is conducting a separate investigation. One hopes that with the skepticism of outsiders, the NCAA will address in more detail the role of top athletic officials and coaches—current and former—within a sports program that has won five national men’s basketball championships. How many members of UNC’s last championship team in 2009 took the no-show classes, and how many did they take? As a signal that academic integrity really outweighs sports accolades, should UNC consider taking down that 2009 championship banner? Has the message penetrated the school’s athletic department to the degree that highly valued athletes are no longer being steered into dubious classes that contribute little to the education they’re owed?

Today’s admission shouldn’t be the end of the inquiry.

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UNC report finds 18 years of academic fraud to keep athletes playing

 
By Sara Ganim and Devon Sayers, CNN Investigations
updated 8:18 PM EDT, Wed October 22, 2014
Your video will play in 11 secs Rahad McCants says that UNC athletes should reveal their transcripts, as these transcripts will show who cheated and who did not to stay eligible.
 

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Report by investigator found advisers funneled athletes to "paper classes"
  • 3,100 students took those bogus classes, Kenneth Wainstein's report finds
  • The report found the practice more widespread than many first thought
  • UNC's national championships could be on the line
 

Chapel Hill, North Carolina (CNN) -- For 18 years, thousands of students at the prestigious University of North Carolina took fake "paper classes," and advisers funneled athletes into the program to keep them eligible, according to a scathing independent report released Wednesday.

"These counselors saw the paper classes and the artificially high grades they yielded as key to helping some student-athletes remain eligible," Kenneth Wainstein wrote in his report. He conducted an eight-month investigation into the scandal, which has plagued the university for nearly five years.

Four employees have been fired and five more disciplined because of their roles. One other former employee had honorary status removed, Chancellor Carol Folt said Wednesday.

Wainstein is the former federal prosecutor hired by UNC to independently investigate the academic fraud brought to light by CNN, the Raleigh News & Observer and other media outlets.

In all, the report estimates, at least 3,100 students took the paper classes, but adds the number "very likely falls far short of the true number."

For the first time since the scandal first came to light five years ago, UNC admitted that the wrongdoing went further than academics and involved its athletic programs.

In fact, Folt said, "it was a university issue."

A stellar reputation comes crashing down

UNC has long been a place where it was believed that athletics and academics went hand in hand. It has enjoyed a stellar reputation, producing basketball greats such as coach Dean Smith and Michael Jordan.

Now, that reputation has been stained.

According to the report, one former head football coach, John Bunting, admitted to knowing of the paper classes and his successor, Butch Davis, also admitted some knowledge. Current men's basketball coach Roy Williams is steadfast that he did not know, Wainstein said.

The detailed 131-page report is being shared with the NCAA and could have huge implications for the university.

In the past 18 years, UNC has won three national championships for college basketball -- in 1993, 2005 and 2009 -- that could be in jeopardy along with countless wins.

And it wasn't just the revenue-generating sports that benefited.

The report says that athletes in a wide range of sports were involved, and it notes a noticeable spike of enrollment of Olympic-sport athletes between 2003 and 2005.

UNC in January: We failed students 'for years'

Report spreads the blame around

For five years, UNC has insisted the paper classes were the doing of one rogue professor: the department chair of the African American studies program, Julius Nyang'oro. Wainstein's report spread the blame much further.

It also revealed that it was Nyang'oro's assistant, Debbie Crowder, who actually created the paper classes out of sympathy for athletes and other students who were not "the best and the brightest." Nyang'oro went along with them when he figured them out.

Crowder was such a fan of UNC sports, particularly basketball, that she would sometimes miss work after a loss, the report says.

It was well-known on campus that Crowder was a lax grader and gave high grades without regard for content, Wainstein said, emphasizing that she never gave a grade unless a student submitted a paper and did not change grades that were already given.

Wainstein did find that five counselors actively used paper classes, calling them "GPA boosters," and that at least two counselors, one in football, suggested to Crowder the grade an athlete needed to receive to be able to continue to play.

Nyang'oro was more hands off. He had initially held legitimate independent studies classes, Wainstein said, but was accused of "being an ass" by counselors who felt he was too hard on athletes. Crowder then took it upon herself to create the first paper classes, naming Nyang'oro as the instructor even though she was managing all aspects of them: sending out paper topics, giving grades and assigning no meeting times.

"It is not clear whether Crowder ever got Nyang'oro's explicit approval to arrange these irregular independent studies. It is clear, however, that he ultimately learned about these classes and acquiesced in them by taking no action to put a halt to them."

When Crowder announced she was retiring, there was a spike in enrollment in the last year of her classes, because football counselors urged student athletes to sign up. Crowder actively tried to cover her activities, according to the report.

UNC fake class scandal and NCAA's response wind their way to Washington

A strategy to keep players eligible

Former head football coach John Bunting admitted that he knew of the paper classes and said that former Director of Football Cynthia Reynolds told him they were part of her strategy to keep players eligible. Reynolds, who is now an academic program coordinator at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, was one of four employees who refused to cooperate with Wainstein's investigation.

The report shows that during Bunting's years as head coach, there was a steady rise of enrollment of football players in the paper classes.

Butch Davis, who succeeded Bunting as coach and was eventually fired in the wake of the scandal in 2011, also admitted to knowing there were "easy classes," Wainstein said.

Basketball coach Roy Williams maintained he had no knowledge of the fraud, Wainstein said, which was supported by a drop in enrollment in the suspect classes by basketball players during his tenure.

Many of the academic-athletic staff who were named and implicated by Wainstein were also named by university Learning Specialist Mary Willingham, who went public with detailed allegations about paper classes and who, after a an all-out assault on her credibility by the university, has since filed a whistleblower suit.

CNN interviewed Willingham in January about her years working with student-athletes. She said that she had worked with dozens of athletes who came to UNC unable to read at an acceptable level, with some of them reading like elementary schoolchildren.

She also said that there were many members of the athletic staff who knew about the paper classes, and her revelations contradicted what UNC had claimed for years -- that Nyang'oro acted alone in providing the paper classes.

Whistle-blower in UNC paper class case files lawsuit

Willingham said paper classes were openly discussed as a way to keep athletes eligible to play, and former football player Michael McAdoo told CNN he was forced into majoring in African American studies, the department at the heart of the paper-classes scandal.

Willingham shared her reaction to the report with CNN on Wednesday:

"I didn't need Wainstein to validate me because the truth is validation enough, but I feel like what I've said for the last five years is in the report.

"I gave Chancellor Folt credit; she did a good job," she said.

Willingham also said she believes it took so many years and six previous investigations because "this is the flagship of the university system and of the state, and to admit we did anything wrong was too difficult there is a level of arrogance here and that's part of the culture."

Refused to help in investigation

Folt would not say who was fired or being disciplined. Wainstein, however, did name those who refused to cooperate, as:

-- Octavus Barnes, academic counselor for football 2002-2009.

-- Carolyn Cannon, associate dean and director of academic advising. 1999-2010, who was the principle adviser for the men's basketball team.

-- Cynthia Reynolds, director of football, 2002-2010. She was called a "critical witness."

-- Everett Withers, interim head football coach in 2011. He's now at James Madison University.

Scandal has been unfolding for years

The first hints of scandal began in 2010, with allegations that some athletes were having improper contact with agents. As the university investigated, it found academic irregularities and finally announced, under pressure from the News & Observer newspaper in Raleigh, that there were classes where very little work was required.

For the next five years, UNC administration was on the defensive, admitting only to allegations as they surfaced and never digging deep to the root of the problem.

Wainstein said he found no evidence that administrators tried to cover up anything.

He attributed the five-year delayed response to "insufficient appreciation of the scale of the problem."

Six previous internally commissioned reports had stopped short of systemic accusations.

Folt said that when she took the job as chancellor in October 2013, she decided to hire Wainstein because there were still too many unanswered questions.

"I wanted to be sure that we wouldn't have to do this again and again," she said.

CNN analysis: Some college athletes play like adults, read like 5th graders

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UNC report forces school to face truth about its culture of cheating

UNC, take down the 2005 Banner!

There was an emergency in the North Carolina football program in the summer 2009.

Deborah Crowder, architect of a massive and long-lasting academic sham, was retiring. Before she left the school, the Tar Heels needed her for one more round of bailouts.

As a member of the academic support staff urgently emailed a director of football operations: "Ms. Crowder is retiring at the end of July . . . if the guys papers are not in . . . I would expect D's or C's at best. Most need better than that . . . ALL WORK FROM THE AFAM DEPT. MUST BE DONE AND TURNED IN ON THE LAST DAY OF CLASS."

View gallery

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(AP/Gerry Broome)Image Enlarger

(AP/Gerry Broome)

The players in question needed A's and B's from Crowder in African and Afro-American Studies classes in order to be eligible to play for the Tar Heels. And that's what she was there to provide in exchange for little or no work – year after year, player after player, for football and basketball and other sports as well. Regular students also benefited from a scheme that disgraces a once-proud university, but athletes flocked to her no-show classes in disproportionate numbers.

That email was part of a 131-page report spearheaded by independent investigator Kenneth Wainstein that was released by UNC on Wednesday. The report laid bare North Carolina's abdication of academic integrity in order to serve up easy grades that kept athletes eligible and on track to graduate.

For years, as the revelations accumulated and no fewer than six other reports were filed, North Carolina refused to look honestly at itself and acknowledge what it saw.

Today, the school can squirm away from the truth no more. Wainstein's report provided a devastating house of mirrors for UNC to gaze into. The loud-and-proud claims to being a special place, capable of both athletic and academic success without cutting corners, are now hollow.

North Carolina spent many years operating like a lowest-common-denominator football/basketball factory. Regardless of whatever else comes from this thorough and painstaking investigation, that label sticks.

The level of academic fraud exposed is staggering: 3,100 students benefitted from the AFAM class scam; of that number, more than 47 percent were athletes – disproportionately high for the student population as a whole. And of that 47 percent, more than half were football players. Men's basketball made up 12 percent of the athlete population that was given gift grades.

The report finds it believable that neither basketball coach Roy Williams nor then-football coach Butch Davis knew the extent of the AFAM scam – specifically, that players were getting gift grades. However, Davis was said to be present during a 2009 power-point presentation by academic support staff to the football staff that included a slide saying that players had been enrolled in classes which featured the following perks: "they didn't go to class; didn't take notes, have to stay awake; they didn't have to meet with professors; they didn't have to pay attention or necessarily engage with the material." (Butch told investigators that he didn't recall seeing that slide. If the current ESPN analyst ever works in college coaching again, someone please shut down the university that hires him.)

Should a coach know what classes his players are taking? I don't know. My son is a student-athlete at Missouri and I'd bet his coaches know his major, but not his specific course load. Then again, he's not an eligibility risk, nor is he vital to a coach maintaining a seven-figure salary. The star football and basketball players are.

But the deniability of Williams and Davis is largely immaterial. Their programs thrived thanks to athletes who couldn't or wouldn't do the work of most normal students. If those Tar Heels who were winning national titles in basketball and going to bowl games in football took anything educational away from their time in Chapel Hill, chances are decent that it was an "A" in a Swahili class that never met. That's something to be proud of.

As UNC wallows in the shame of this scandal, the next question is whether Wainstein has given the NCAA enough ammunition to aim and fire at the school.

The governing body of college sports took its sweet time launching its own investigation of UNC, to the frustration of many. For years, the stated reason for inaction was that the academic benefits enjoyed by the athletes also was perfectly available to the student body as a whole, and thus not a violation of NCAA rules.

 

View gallery

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North Carolina basketball coach Roy Williams talks to media during a press conference. (AP)Image Enlarger

North Carolina basketball coach Roy Williams talks to media during a press conference. (AP)

It's true that more than 1,500 regular students did benefit from no-show classes, per the report. But if nearly an equal number of athletes were involved in flagrant academic fraud that resulted in a clear competitive advantage – stars were eligible to play, and to beat the pants off opposing teams – then this would seem to be a case where the NCAA should intercede.
If the association's baroque and bewildering rules manual prevents it, well, shame on the NCAA. It would be one more example of why it is a failed investigative force.

We can wait and see what results come from Indianapolis, but don't hold your breath in anticipation of a deathblow for Carolina – especially Carolina basketball.

If anything, the school should react on its own to this report. Don't wait for the NCAA to step in, do something yourself.

Now that UNC knows the independently reported facts, it can act. For years, its championship basketball teams were populated by players who benefitted from academic fraud – the 2005 national title team alone had 10 AFAM majors. If those titles were won with players who wouldn't have been eligible without sham grades, take down the banners yourself. Take the hardware out of the trophy cases. Wear your shame.

For a school that long proclaimed to be a special place, that would be a start on restoring its integrity.

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NCAA's response to damning UNC report will define its future

Stewart Mandel

FOX Sports October 22

http://www.foxsports.com/colle.....caa-102214

In October 2000, the NCAA Committee on Infractions handed Minnesota’s men’s basketball program a one-year postseason ban, reduced scholarships and vacated a Final Four appearance because a secretary for longtime coach Clem Haskins had written papers (with his knowledge) for at least 18 players over a five-year period. In its report, the committee described the violations as “among the most serious academic fraud violations to come before it in the past 20 years. The violations were significant, widespread and intentional. More than that, their nature — academic fraud — undermined the bedrock foundation of a university and the operation of its intercollegiate athletics program.”

 

On Wednesday, Kenneth L. Wainstein released the results of an independent investigation into academic fraud at the University of North Carolina so massive in scope that the word serious hardly does it justice. If three rogue employees and 18 cheating basketball players over a five-year period at Minnesota merited those strong words, what will the NCAA eventually say about a bogus-class scheme in Chapel Hill that Wainstein found to involve more than 3,100 students — 47.4 percent of them athletes — over 18 years?

Wainstein describes a culture in which academic-athletic counselors for the football and basketball teams knowingly steered borderline students to Afro-American studies office manager Debbie Crowder’s sham classes for the primary purpose of keeping players eligible.

Just how widespread was this ring of corruption? Jan Boxill, a philosophy professor whose formal title is director of the Parr Center for Ethics, steered women’s basketball players to Crowder and literally named their grade. “Did you say a D will do?” Crowder wrote to Boxill in an e-mail about one player who had apparently recycled an old paper. “Yes, a D will be fine; that’s all she needs,” Boxill replied.

It’s standard practice these days to mock the NCAA for its antiquated rules and haphazard enforcement of them, but the North Carolina report does not involve tattoos for memorabilia, free hotel stays or agent payments. It details systemic abuse of the one area the NCAA purportedly holds most dear. Its mission statement, according to president Mark Emmert, is “to be an integral part of higher education and to focus on the development of our student-athletes.” Those Enterprise rental car commercials, those “going pro in something other than sports” PSAs, the obsession with APR scores and Graduation Success Rates — all reinforce the NCAA’s stated-though-not-always-followed contention that academics are paramount to the college athlete’s experience.

So today, Emmert and the NCAA face a defining moment. What are they going to do about North Carolina? How do you appropriately reprimand a university whose employees spent 18 years making a mockery of higher education? Who put the competitive needs of athletics above the academic development of students? Who made “the most serious academic fraud violations in 20 years” — Haskins’ 18 cheating basketball players — seem like child’s play when compared with the unfathomable scope of UNC’s “shadow curriculum.”

I don’t know what the appropriate punishment is. There’s nothing in the NCAA handbook to address something quite like this, and even if there was, the organization could make up something else if it pleases. It did with Penn State. It did with those Ohio State Sugar Bowl players. The North Carolina scandal comes at a time when there’s never been less faith in the NCAA’s enforcement process.

In fact, the NCAA has largely stood by on the sideline as the UNC scandal unfolded over the past four years. The Committee on Infractions did slap the Tar Heels’ football program with a one-year bowl ban in 2012, but that was primarily for extra benefits violations stemming from former assistant John Blake’s ties to a sports agent. The academic fraud covered in that report centered on a lone tutor, Jennifer Wiley, helping players write papers.

It was due to that investigation, though, that details began to emerge about a scourge of athletes taking phony classes in the AFAM department. Report after report followed, but the NCAA showed no intention of intervening, apparently accepting the premise in initial university audits that the scandal was an academic, not athletic, issue.

But then, last June, the NCAA announced it was reopening the case in Chapel Hill. The timing was no accident. Wainstein had begun his work in February and, unlike previous investigators, was able to speak with the two primary culprits, Crowder and her longtime boss Julius Nyang’oro. The floodgates apparently opened, and today, Wainstein delivered a report that definitively shows both the academic and athletic arms played a part.

"It's very clear that this is an academic, an athletic and a university problem," UNC chancellor Carol Folt said Wednesday.

Much like Penn State’s Freeh Report, Wainstein has gift-wrapped the NCAA an investigative report more exhaustive and comprehensive than anything its own people could have produced. And if the school accepts it as fact, then, like with Penn State, Emmert and/or the Committee on Infractions might as well, too.

“The information included in the Wainstein Report will be reviewed by the university and the enforcement staff under the same standards that are applied in all NCAA infractions cases,” said a joint statement released by the school and the NCAA.

The NCAA has no choice but to deliver a stern punishment to North Carolina or risk losing all credibility whenever Emmert or its leaders talk big about the importance of academics. But what that punishment will be is anyone’s guess.

This scandal touched all athletes, not just football and basketball, though Wainstein’s report says the “revenue sports” were the highest-represented. For example, 10 of the 15 members of Roy Williams’ 2005 national title team were AFAM majors. The report states Williams did not know of that department’s shadow curriculum but was “suspicious” enough about the clustering to instruct his hand-picked academic counselor, Wayne Walden, to make sure players were not being steered there.

But Walden himself acknowledged he was aware that an office manager, Crowder, was grading players’ papers, which makes him one of a myriad of athletic or athletic-related employees who knew something was amiss but did nothing to stop it. How could they? As one passage of the report says: “It was quite clear to the counselors — at least those in the revenue sports — that they were being evaluated by the coaches and judged by their success in keeping players eligible to play ball.”

Maybe wins and trophies will be vacated. Maybe more postseason bans are in store. Maybe something more severe. There’s no blueprint.

Whatever the punishment, it has to effectively send the message that academics, more than anything else, cannot be compromised for the sake of athletics success. The cynics will say that already happens, that there’s jock majors and easy classes at every school. Maybe so, but we don’t know that.

We only know what happened at UNC. And if the NCAA does not demonstrate the extent of its disincentive, then it does risk what happened at UNC happening everywhere else.

MORE COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Want stories delivered to you? Make sure you get all of our content by liking the CFB on FOX Facebook page.

Stewart Mandel is a senior college sports columnist for FOXSports.com. He covered college football and basketball for 15 years at Sports Illustrated. His new book, “The Thinking Fan’s Guide to the College Football Playoff,” is now available on Amazon. You can follow him on Twitter @slmandel. Send emails and Mailbag questions to Stewart.Mandel@fox.com

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The national media has awakened:

 

Fox Sports: NCAA's response to UNC Report will define it's future

http://www.foxsports.com/colle.....caa-102214

Yahoo: Probe reveals athletes steered to Bogus Classes at UNC

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/.....14478.html

Deadspin: Investigation reveals widespread academic fraud at UNC

http://deadspin.com/unc-invest.....1649405561

NY Post: Massive Fraud uncovered at UNC

http://nypost.com/2014/10/22/m.....ed-at-unc/

ESPN: Whistleblower says advisors pushed sham classes

http://espn.go.com/college-spo.....am-classes

Fox News: Probe reveals scope of fraud at UNC

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014.....ud-at-unc/

New York Times: UNC report reveals shadow curriculum to help athletes

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10......html?_r=0

Sporting News: Fraud Stretched from Mack Brown to Butch Davis years at UNC

http://www.sportingnews.com/nc.....is-tenures

News & Observer: 9 at UNC being fired (but not Roy)

http://www.newsobserver.com/20.....&rh=1

News & Observer: Wainstein report on Jan Boxil role

http://www.newsobserver.com/20.....#038;ihp=1

Read report:  http://media2.newsobserver.com.....So.156.pdf

BusinessWeek: UNC admits fake classes for athletes were widespread

http://www.businessweek.com/ar.....widespread

Gary Parrish: CBS Sports Basketball:  Roy Williams role in Scandal: Plausible Deniability. Latest coach to act like he's been kept in the dark.

http://www.cbssports.com/colle.....n-the-dark

CNN: 18 years of Fraud at UNC to keep athletes playing

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/22/.....homepage-t

Durham Herald Sun: No closure for UNC in report aftermath

http://www.heraldsun.com/news/.....-athletics

News & Record: Cheating undermines any UNC athletic accomplishments

http://www.news-record.com/blo.....f6878.html

Q & A: N&O: Impact of Wainstein Report on UNC:

http://www.newsobserver.com/20.....p=/99/103/

Yahoo: Forde: UNC Needs to Take Down the Banners

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/u.....ntentstory

Business Insider: UNC Ath Department Uses Insane Slide to defend Bogus Classes

http://www.businessinsider.com.....es-2014-10

Chronicle Of Higher Education: Major players in UNC Fraud Case

http://chronicle.com/article/K.....ud/149583/

Chronicle Of Higher Education: 3 Key Findings in UNC Investigation

http://chronicle.com/blogs/tic.....tion/88325

N& O editorial: UNCH Report Brings out the Hard Truths

http://www.newsobserver.com/20......html?rh=1

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October 23, 2014
2:47 pm
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 CNN: http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/22/us/unc-...?iref=allsearch

Gerald Gurney, president of the Drake Group, whose mission is "to defend academic integrity in higher education from the corrosive aspects of commercialized college sports," said the findings should provide fodder for the NCAA to levy one of its most severe charges against UNC: lack of institutional control.

"I can safely say that the scope of the 20-year UNC fraud scandal easily takes the prize for the largest and most nefarious scandal in the history of NCAA enforcement. The depth and breadth of the scheme -- involving counselors, coaches, academic administrators, faculty, athletic administrators, et cetera -- eclipses any previous case," Gurney said.

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