North Carolina (UNC) Cheating Scandal. UNC Is the biggest cheater of all-time. 20 years of 3000 fake classes, 500 unauthorized grade changes. 100s of players who cannot do college work. Businessweek, | Page 8 | Football and General Sports Discussions | Forum

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North Carolina (UNC) Cheating Scandal. UNC Is the biggest cheater of all-time. 20 years of 3000 fake classes, 500 unauthorized grade changes. 100s of players who cannot do college work. Businessweek,
November 29, 2015
8:58 am
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Sparty1
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Cavalier said
Stupid Jay Bilas is vigorously defending UNC. Of course he is a huge suck-up at ESPN and he knows the ESPN president, John Skipper, is a huge UNCHeat fan.

Bilas says UNC men's basketball is not under investigation. Of course, Bilas likes to also suck up to Coach K and apparently plays both sides. Recall this bigoted statement from JayBi? "If I had not gone to school at Duke, I would have hated Duke, too." How about changing a few words: "If I had not gone to the Jewish temple, I would have hated Jews, too." I understand the huge majority of Duke grads see Bilas for the fake he is.

Bilas was a terrible baskeball player and a worse reader:

NCAA Notice of Allegations to CHEAT U:

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6,806 UNC-acknowledged enrollments in fake classes
2,645 UNC-acknowledged enrollments by athletes in fake classes

UNC-acknowledged FACT:
Over 1,400 athletes were involved in cheating from over 20 different sports over a 23 year period.

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FACT: UNC acknowledged numerous enrollments by basketball players from the 1993, 2005, and 2009 title teams in fake classes.

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November 29, 2015
2:44 pm
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Sparty1 said

Cavalier said
Stupid Jay Bilas is vigorously defending UNC. Of course he is a huge suck-up at ESPN and he knows the ESPN president, John Skipper, is a huge UNCHeat fan.

Bilas says UNC men's basketball is not under investigation. Of course, Bilas likes to also suck up to Coach K and apparently plays both sides. Recall this bigoted statement from JayBi? "If I had not gone to school at Duke, I would have hated Duke, too." How about changing a few words: "If I had not gone to the Jewish temple, I would have hated Jews, too." I understand the huge majority of Duke grads see Bilas for the fake he is.

Bilas was a terrible baskeball player and a worse reader:

NCAA Notice of Allegations to CHEAT U:

Embedded image permalinkImage Enlarger

Embedded image permalinkImage Enlarger
6,806 UNC-acknowledged enrollments in fake classes
2,645 UNC-acknowledged enrollments by athletes in fake classes
UNC-acknowledged FACT:
Over 1,400 athletes were involved in cheating from over 20 different sports over a 23 year period.
Embedded image permalinkImage Enlarger
Embedded image permalinkImage Enlarger
FACT: UNC acknowledged numerous enrollments by basketball players from the 1993, 2005, and 2009 title teams in fake classes.

This is the most disgusting thing I have ever seen in NCAA sports. North Carolina was running a plantation for black athletes. Not to their long term benefit.

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November 29, 2015
6:47 pm
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WalkingGator
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Admission of fictitious classes: LOL

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November 29, 2015
7:02 pm
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UNCHeats: Over $10 million in pr and attorney fees. A UNC professor speaks up.

November 28, 2015

At UNC, abdicating the obligations of leadership in scandal

When we spend millions on the nation’s most expensive lawyers and corporate consultants, we deploy funds that could have supported impoverished Carolina Covenant students, or increased skimpy graduate student stipends, or raised the salaries of maintenance workers

So enough with the “it’s only private money” charade

 
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November 30, 2015
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Blind Gene Finds An Acorn

BobLee--- UNC graduate
November29/ 2015

If a stopped watch is right twice a day…. and a blind hog CAN find the occasional acorn…. then

UNC’s Gene “The Gasbag” Nichol can be right ….. maybe once in a dozen blue moons.

Mark this…. Gene is Right on his latest N&O Rant about UNCCH’s SuperSecret Cover Our Ass $$$ Stash for Spinning The Great  Unpleasantness.

UNC’s ongoing flim flam about “all these bazillions of COA $$$$ are not really coming from operating funds…. they are all coming from “somewhere else but don’t ask where because…. well, just don’t ask”.   Gene asks.

To be more precise, Gene confirms what everyone always knew…. all the bazillions of COA $$$ ARE coming from funds originally intended for quasi-legitimate purposes.    I say quasi-legitimate because NOTHING that happens in Big Academia is truly legitimate any more.Carol Folt worriesImage Enlarger

I do love Gene’s WHAMMO that:

UNC Admins are SUPPOSED to be competent enough to deal with “issues” without contracting out “the yucky ones” to high-priced legal mouthpieces and equally high-priced PR slicks.   Pretty much EVERYONE has been thinking THAT too.

Sure…. we all knew Chihuahua was hired because (1) she sits down to pee…. and (2) she came from The Ivy League.  Maybe (3) No one else wanted to inherit The Mess.   Being a walking billboard for socio-cultural-political traumas de’jour – a/k/a her infamous lapel ribbon collection…. is the extent of Madame Folt’s meager leadership skill set.  Provost Dean makes a bull-in-a-china shop look like a ballerina …. and the entire “tits on a bull” BOT has gone AWOL apparently hiding in the labyrinthian catacombs of The Rat.   “They” hired a $400,000 Vice Chanc of Spin & Obfuscation to go out and hire a million dollar crony PR firm.

Any hoo…. read Gene’s raging rant below.   Normally I provide a link to the actual source but this is in Sunday’s News & Observer and it’ll be a VERY cold day in Hell before I send those no-count SOBs any clicks.

###

 

At UNC, abdicating the obligations of leadership in scandal

By Gene Nichol Gene NicholImage Enlarger

November 29, 2015
When we spend millions on the nation’s most expensive lawyers and corporate consultants, we deploy funds that could have supported impoverished Carolina Covenant students, or increased skimpy graduate student stipends, or raised the salaries of maintenance workers

So enough with the “it’s only private money” charade

 

Like many, I was distressed, though not surprised, that UNC-CH has spent north of $10 million on public relations consultants and lawyers to deal with our academic and athletic scandals. I suppose this is what the aspiration to “run the university like a business” looks like.

Over $5 million went to Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft. The folks at Skadden, Arps got a couple million more. We paid $1.3 million to Bond, Schoeneck & King; another million to Baker, Tilly. Almost double that amount went to Edelman, a giant PR outfit, offering expertise on “corporate reputation management.” FleishmanHillard raked in almost $400,000. You’d think the Old Well had relocated to Madison Avenue.

High-dollar outside investigators were reportedly necessary because, after years of stonewalling and false assurance, no one would believe an analysis conducted by the administration. A campus public relations officer explained, enthusiastically, that the millions to Edelman were spent to “support our management of media relations, content creation and internal communication.” FleishmanHillard’s website boasts it is “the most complete communications agency in the world, capable of reaching any audience, with any message, through any channel.” Praise the Lord. The new Carolina Way revealed.

There are, I suppose, millions of things that could be said of this. I limit myself to two.

First, at the end of every story about UNC’s breathtaking expenditures, the same concluding assurance appears.

“Officials say that none of these legal and public relations bills are paid for by tuition or state appropriations.” The money comes from the private UNC Foundation. Not to worry.

This is, at best, only half the story. Much money given to the university is designated for a specific purpose – to create scholarships for needy students, to build new classroom facilities, to support professorships in the arts, and the like.

The dollars used to pay PR flacks and branding specialists, on the other hand, must come from undesignated gifts. Surely no donor has established a fund to help the chancellor decide and articulate what the university stands for. I’m guessing it never before would have been thought necessary.

When we spend $10 million or $15 million on the nation’s most expensive lawyers and corporate consultants, we deploy funds that could have supported impoverished Carolina Covenant students, or increased skimpy graduate student stipends, or raised the salaries of maintenance workers. I’ve never heard the university admit this. So enough with the “it’s only private money” charade.

Second, when did we decide to routinely outsource the obligations of leadership?

Chapel Hill has a very robust legion of well-provided for administrators. We have a chancellor and a provost. Each has a bountiful array of associates. They are supported by a hefty public relations team and a first-rate group of lawyers.

Still, these days, whenever we face a significant challenge, we assume the need to hire a bevy of the nation’s highest-paid consultants to teach us how to behave like a decent institution. Having abdicated the obligations of leadership, we seem to think wisdom, character and savvy can be purchased. It’s not working.

Our greatest chancellor, William B. Aycock, died a few months ago. Dealing with crises like the Dixie Classic and the Speaker Ban, Aycock saw his share of trouble. Still, he never considered hiring “the most complete communications agency in the world.”

Thinking of Aycock, it’s easy to envision two distinct approaches to leadership and problem solving. In the first, decision-makers sit around a huge table in South Building. There is a chancellor and her cadre of assistants. And then a provost and his sizable group. Add to that our internal public relations team. And our external PR posse. Then there are internal and external groups of lawyers. As I said, it’s a big table.

They work for days, or weeks, responding to a crisis. Eventually a decision is made, and the group produces a statement to be issued by the chancellor.

The final product is so chockablock with doublespeak that faculty members jokingly circulate email translations for the bureaucratically unschooled.

In the other model, Aycock returns to his campus office late in the evening after having had dinner with his family. He has consulted with university officials throughout the day. Now he sits behind his desk, a small lamp providing illumination. He makes the toughest decisions. And with pen and yellow legal pad, he explains them to the university community and to the people of North Carolina.

The first model, of course, costs millions. The second, a relative pittance. But the cheap route would outperform the big boys every time.

Gene Nichol is Boyd Tinsley Distinguished Professor at UNC-Chapel Hill.
Op-Ed


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November 30, 2015
8:57 am
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All Brad Bethel wanted was for athletes just to pass his LEEP program (in which nearly illiterate athletes were taught basic reading and math in hopes they could complete some UNC regular or fraudulent courses!!):

 

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December 1, 2015
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IndianaBen said

 

All Brad Bethel wanted was for athletes just to pass his LEEP program (in which nearly illiterate athletes were taught basic reading and math in hopes they could complete some UNC regular or fraudulent courses!!):
 

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More corruption to keep near-illiterates eligible.

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December 1, 2015
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cjones22 said

IndianaBen said

 

All Brad Bethel wanted was for athletes just to pass his LEEP program (in which nearly illiterate athletes were taught basic reading and math in hopes they could complete some UNC regular or fraudulent courses!!):
 

IPB ImageImage Enlarger

More corruption to keep near-illiterates eligible.

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Mary Willingham warned UNC : 8-11 percent of football and basketball players were illiterate and 60% read at the 4th to 8th grade levels. No wonder UNC cheated so outrageously for 20 years. Yep, it started under Dean Smith.

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December 5, 2015
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GoArmy said

cjones22 said

IndianaBen said

 

All Brad Bethel wanted was for athletes just to pass his LEEP program (in which nearly illiterate athletes were taught basic reading and math in hopes they could complete some UNC regular or fraudulent courses!!):
 

IPB ImageImage Enlarger

More corruption to keep near-illiterates eligible.

IPB ImageImage Enlarger

Mary Willingham warned UNC : 8-11 percent of football and basketball players were illiterate and 60% read at the 4th to 8th grade levels. No wonder UNC cheated so outrageously for 20 years. Yep, it started under Dean Smith.

Embedded image permalinkImage Enlarger

Jay Bilas. LOL. Total gamesman/as*k***er. Spinning and denying reality works when your boss is hyper UNCHeat fan John Skipper (CEO of ESPN). Guess why ESPN is the only sports network not to cover the most humongous athletic cheating to stay eligible scheme in college sports history? LOL.

And this is the POS that said about his own school: "If I had not gone to school there, I would hate Duke, too." His own school. What an ingrate!

@JudgeBobOrr Specific charges of NOA do not include that for those classes. NCAA rules, bylaws intentionally don't cover it.

@JayBilas NCAA trying to avoid responsibility in NOA. Test is school personnel involved in fraudulent credit for S/A. UNC classic Ac. fraud.

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December 9, 2015
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Unbelievable! UNCHEAT!

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December 9, 2015
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December 14, 2015
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The Biggest Lesson from the UNC Academic Scandal Has Been Ignored

By Jesse Saffron and Jenna A. Robinson

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December 14, 2015

 

For several years, North Carolina higher education news has been dominated by a massive scandal at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The most comprehensive account to date, based on an investigation conducted by former federal prosecutor Kenneth Wainstein, revealed that for nearly two decades, systemic academic and athletics fraud had corrupted one of the most prestigious public universities in America.

The scandal not only brought shame to the state’s flagship university, but it also forced the school chancellor, a head coach, several department heads, and others out of their jobs. In an 18-year span (1993–2011), more than 3,100 UNC-CH athletes and non-athletes took “no-show” classes and received good grades for shoddy—and often plagiarized—papers. Some faculty, administrators, and academic support specialists participated in the scam, which among other things allowed 329 athletes to keep their eligibility. Other officials were aware of this wrongdoing, but opted to remain silent.

Following such revelations, university leaders in Chapel Hill and the system pledged to right those wrongs and usher-in a new era of accountability and integrity. 

Unfortunately, it appears that no such “golden age” will materialize. A new report on the state’s intercollegiate athletics programs produced by the UNC system’s general administration shows that the hardest lesson from the largest academic scandal in NCAA history is being ignored. Athletes with weak academic skills continue to be admitted to universities where they have little chance of successfully completing rigorous coursework.

In fact, universities seem to be going in the wrong direction.

In the 2012-13 academic year, 23 athletes in the UNC system received admissions standards exceptions, meaning they failed to meet system-wide minimum admissions requirements (800 combined math and reading SAT scores and 2.5 high school GPA). Another 22 received course requirement exceptions, meaning they failed to complete college-track language, math, and science courses in high school.

In the wake of a protracted scandal defined by its academic impropriety and low standards, one would expect such exceptions to end or at least decline. Instead, the system’s latest athletics report shows that 49 recruited athletes were admitted to UNC institutions with admissions standards exceptions in 2014-15. And 32 athletes were admitted despite their not meeting minimum course requirements. Over 25 percent of the minimum admissions requirement exceptions were made by UNC-CH and NC State University—schools with the most celebrated athletics programs in the state system.

While those exceptions are cause for concern, some of the academic profiles of students who do meet systemwide admissions standards are equally alarming. For example, the report indicates that for the 2014-15 year, the average SAT of football players at UNC-CH was 982, while their average high school core course GPA was 3.29. This is a decline from the 2012-13 academic year, in which those averages were 1060 and 3.43, respectively.

East Carolina University—which competes in Division IA, the top tier of college athletics—also has experienced serious declines. In the past two years, entering ECU football players’ average GPA fell from 3.1 to 2.8, and SAT scores dipped from 946 to 897. At other schools in the UNC system, there has been a mix of backsliding and improvement. At NC State, for instance, basketball players’ average GPA fell from 3.14 in 2012-13 to 2.87 in 2014-15, but their average SAT score rose from 780 to 930. (One wonders, however, whether that increase resulted from just one or two good students.)

To understand the severity of these athletes’ academic ill-preparation, it helps to compare their SAT scores and high school GPAs to those of the general student body, which are often much more competitive, and to the standards recommended by the College Board that creates and administers the SAT. For if an athlete is not ready to compete academically at a particular university, he or she will not—and, in fact, should not—perform well if that institution is maintaining high academic standards.

A 2010 report produced by the College Board found that, to be “college ready,” or to have “at least a 65 percent probability of obtaining a B- (or 2.67 or higher first year grade point average),” a student needs to score a combined 1030 on the math and verbal portions of the SAT and have a 3.33 high school GPA—a “B” average—after completing courses of average difficulty.

In the 2014-15 year, the average SAT score for non-athletes in the UNC system was 1105. For football players, it was 902. And the gap in educational preparedness is even more acute at the system’s top-tier schools. At UNC-CH, where non-athletes’ average SAT score is 1308 and average high school GPA is 4.63, the football players’ average SAT score of 982 and average GPA of 3.29 seem to pale in comparison. This raises the question of whether those players can successfully complete one semester, much less four years of high-level coursework.

“How, if you throw in another 20 or 30 hours per week of football practice, can someone with a 982 make it through school?” asked UNC system Board of Governors member Marty Kotis at last week’s Educational Planning, Policies, and Programs committee meeting, at which the athletics report was a topic of discussion. 

UNC-Chapel Hill’s Chancellor, Carol Folt, responded with a standard but fallacious explanation: “I think if you look at SATs, you are probably looking at something that is not a very good predictor, so we’ve started looking at GPAs more. SATs are notoriously biased against certain students. [Every] student in all of our institutions tends to have an individualized advising program—that is where we have to start looking.” 

Folt’s comment about the lack of predictive ability of SAT scores is refuted by mounting empirical evidence. As just one example, a recent study of 150,000 students from 110 colleges—summarized in this Slate article by psychology professors David Z. Hambrick and Christopher Chabris—found that SAT and high school GPA are on par in terms of their ability to predict first-year college GPA. But the best prediction, the authors of the study concluded, is obtained by using both SAT and GPA. 

Furthermore, SAT scores and GPAs tend to be strongly correlated. In most cases in the UNC athletics report, when GPA falls significantly, SAT scores fall and vice versa.

And when we consider the problem of grade inflation at the high school level, and the fact that almost all Chapel Hill applicants have high GPAs, the need for some objective measure of student ability becomes clear. 

The notion implied in Folt’s comments, that increased hand-holding via academic counseling or other interventions will ameliorate “student-athletes’” academic shortcomings, is also highly debatable. When athletes are only able to navigate their way through coursework by being coddled by advisors, professors, and administrators, it becomes necessary to ask whether the purpose is education or eligibility. Too often, the real answer is that such programs are intended to keep top athletes eligible at all costs, even if they can’t do the work. An institution that knowingly participates in such chicanery loses its claims to having academic integrity.

To be fair, UNC-CH and other universities deserve some credit for implementing policies designed to reduce the likelihood of a second scandal. For instance, UNC schools now conduct “course cluster” analysis to determine if too many athletes are flocking into easy classes or independent studies.

Also, in 2014-15, every UNC school satisfied the NCAA’s Academic Progress Rate standards—something that hadn’t happened in five years. (Of course, that may merely mean they have better learned to “game” the system.) 

Still, the latest data from the UNC system suggest that higher education leaders in North Carolina refuse to accept the primary cause of the academic fraud scandal: the recruitment of students valued more for their abilities on the field than for their abilities in the classroom. Almost all of the corruption that we’ve witnessed at UNC in recent years has stemmed from just such recruitment.

On the surface, 2015 has been a good year for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In the summer, officials announced that in the previous fiscal year, which ended June 30, the school had raked-in a record $447 million in donations.

And on December 5, its football team almost beat number one-ranked Clemson in the Atlantic Coast Conference championship. Despite that loss, coach Larry Fedora, who recently signed a 7-year, $13.7 million contract extension, could take credit for leading UNC to its first 12-win season if it defeats Baylor University in the Russell Athletic Bowl later this month. 

So long as the donations keep flowing and the sports wins keep piling up, it’s far-fetched to expect North Carolina’s public universities to adequately police themselves. That’s why, if universities continue to abdicate their responsibilities, the system’s Board of Governors must get involved. At the very least, it can end universities’ practice of admitting students whose SAT scores and GPAs fall below the system-wide minimum admissions standards.

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