North Carolina (UNC) Cheating Scandal. UNC Is the biggest cheater of all-time. 20 years of 3000 fake classes, 500 unauthorized grade changes. 100s of players who cannot do college work. Businessweek, | Page 6 | Football and General Sports Discussions | Forum

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North Carolina (UNC) Cheating Scandal. UNC Is the biggest cheater of all-time. 20 years of 3000 fake classes, 500 unauthorized grade changes. 100s of players who cannot do college work. Businessweek,
November 6, 2014
1:20 pm
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Instapundit's Glenn Reynolds:

IF UNC WANTS TO TALK ABOUT “PROFESSIONALISM,” MAYBE IT SHOULD QUIT OFFERING FAKE COURSES TO FAVORED STUDENTS: UNC, Halloween, and the ‘Professionalism’ Threat to the First Amendment. University administrators can’t stand being satirized. But if that bothers them, they should try to be less ridiculous.

Seriously, UNC, you have no standing here. None at all.

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November 9, 2014
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Dan Kane's article for the 11/08 News and Observer:

http://www.newsobserver.com/20.....sters.html

"During the season that the UNC men’s basketball team made its run to the 2005 NCAA championship, its players accounted for 35 enrollments in classes that didn’t meet and yielded easy, high grades awarded by the architect of the university’s academic scandal."

 
Looks like every game had appearances by many ineligible players--like 8 or 9. By the rules, all those wins are vacated.A player's gotta have an overall GPA of 2.0 (w/o help of bogus classes) and carry 12 hours (bogus hours do not count) every semester a player is on an NCAA team.
Note how Kane (rhymes with Pulitzer; well, kinda) savages Ol' Roy.
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November 11, 2014
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Disturbing....apparently, the cheating basketball player was Ty Lawson. Looks like the 2005 NC in basketball is gone. Now, 2009 NC.

Link to audio interview

Deadspin Article: Former UNC Player Details Academic Fraud, Says "Everybody Knew"


Powell: Hey, I’ve been hearing about this Carolina stuff man. This Tydreke Powell. I played D-tackle. I got that old shiv(???) man. And Matthew you right, Matthew, dude is ignorant man. You know [inaudible] you know what I’m saying some stupid stuff like. But let me tell you man, it ain’t the players, you know what I’m saying, cause I’m taking this to the hall. You know everybody’s blaming the players and stuff. If you ain’t inside of there man, you don’t know what is going on. But Butch Davis came into a meeting one day and man and said if y’all came here for an education, you should have went to Harvard man. When you come and say that to 17, 18 year old black…, majority of us were black. We come straight from the hood. I’m gonna say it man. It might not be shooting and killing or whatever, but you know what I’m saying. When they come to these guys want Superbowls man, they coming with their Superbowl ring [**** bleep] like that man. These guys don’t come to our living rooms and say, hey we educate this whole football, football, then we like okay yeah, you gonna get your degree and stuff like that, but somebody say that man, you came here for an education you should have went to Harvard. What do…whose fault is it? That is our leader man.


Host: You actually played under Butch and that whole era?


Powell: 07 to 2011 man. And I played, you know what I’m saying


Host: Fair


Powell: It ain’t that we go in there and we wanna take African American studies. How did we know about it? They put it on the table for us, okay you can do this and do that.  It’s one thing they tell, these coaches man, listen man, you a freak man, we gonna get you 3 and out of here. You know what I’m saying. You Most of us coming from little town. When we get into Chapel Hill, chapel Hill ain’t really big man, but you know what I’m saying. Most of us ain’t been around for stuff like that. Man, you know what I’m saying. These coaches man, I’m telling you man.


Host: Did you get your degree?


Powell: I did


Host: In what?


Powell: In communications


Host: Just to ask you, did you take some courses you know. Host 2: Did you take the African American, the paper classes?


Powell: I did


Host 2: Word, and everybody knew they were paper classes?


Powell: Yeah, every…I mean you, it was no class or anything like that, you know what I’m saying it was like a 20 to 15 page and you just turn it at end of semester. They basically like take you to like some place in Durham or something and they like you take this test and don’t get nothing wrong, we be like a experiment or something, don’t put these blocks together. I mean it was something simple 1 2 3, you could get it right, but they want you to get it wrong so they could had on paper to get you a note taker or something like that.


Host 2: This is the million dollar question. Did Roy Williams..did you think Roy Williams knows?


Powerll: Man, Roy…man you know he know man. Roy Williams a snake, man.


Host: Were there basketball players in the same classes you were taking doing the same stuff you were doing?


Powerll: Listen, Let me tell you right here man. One thing about Carolina man. If you ain’t got a class with a basketball player, you better go find one. Cause If you got one with them, you know it’s an A. cause man, I am telling you. Like they breathe. Like those guys I mean you know what I’m saying.  Butch Davis was kinda turning around man but we still didn’t get no respect. But when these guys, man, when you walk into class man and you see a basketball player and if you drop that class, you were just ignorant man. For example, I had a class with [basketball player name, bleeped], he was the only one in there with four of us, football players. He didn’t come to class at all man. He didn’t come into class at all. He came to take the class. He didn’t even take it. It was this girl in front of us who took his test, then she gave it to him and we ran a train on it. [Audible oh] But it is how it is. [Audible yeah] You know what I’m saying. People just looking from the outside man and gonna say these kids. No man, its them coaches man that’s telling us like what we were supposed to do man. We away from our parents and stuff, we looking up to this guy.  You know what I’m saying. When they they come to your house, your living. They got them Superbowl ring on man. The last thing you thinking about is a class man. You know what I’m saying.


Host: I appreciate you for calling in. You goitta get back to this radio thing. You are welcome to call back anytime.


Powell: Oh yeah

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November 12, 2014
11:12 pm
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Could Roy Williams, Tar Heels be stripped of title?

 Keith Jarrett, kjarrett@citizen-times.com 6:34 a.m. EST November 12, 2014
172 33 LINKEDIN 18 COMMENTMORE

Many have tired — especially those prone to wearing Carolina Blue — of the story that refuses to end, the ongoing saga of academic and athletic fraud in Chapel Hill.

A systematic cheating scandal that spanned 18 years and included thousands of students — including more than 1,100 athletes — has tarnished a carefully crafted image of integrity that now appears as bogus as the grades on classes that never met and papers that required not much more than a signature to earn marks high enough to keep athletes eligible.

And just when you thought the controversy was dying — right on time for a college basketball season filled with hope, returning talent and talented freshmen for North Carolina — comes the latest revelation that could bring down a national championship banner.

The 2005 title team that featured four future NBA first-round draft picks was fueled not only by superior talent and the steady hand of second-year coach Roy Williams but also by 35 enrollments in the sham African American Studies program designed to produce As for athletes for little or no class work or attendance.

In fall 2004, when eligibility for the spring semester was established, Roy's boys had nine enrollments.

In the spring, when the team was rolling through the ACC season and the NCAA tournament, there were 26 enrollments.

Asheville's Rashad McCants, the team's shooting guard, was the poster boy for AFAM scholarly achievement.

On the court that season, he averaged 16.4 points a game. And in classrooms he apparently never graced that spring, McCants was awarded four As in AFAM classes that earned him a spot on the Dean's List — and we're not referring to Dean Smith.

Remember when McCants came out over the summer and talked about taking all those sham classes, insisted his teammates did the same and claimed fellow Asheville native Williams was aware of the scam?

It took the Carolina PR machine one day to refute those charges by producing a joint statement signed by 16 players off the 2005 team.

"With conviction, each one of us is proud to say that we attended class and did our own academic work," the players said.

"In light of the comments made by Rashad on ESPN Outside the Lines, we want to state that our personal academic experiences are not consistent with Rashad's claims."

Well, that statement appears as bogus as AFAM.

Take away McCants' four classes, and that still left 22 enrollments in the spring semester from the group who said they went to class and did their own work.

The Wainstein Report and more documents released recently show that at least five of those players who signed that statement took three bogus classes each that spring semester.

What does it all mean?

On Williams' part, he has insisted he had no knowledge of the AFAM scam and that he was so concerned that 10 players on that 2005 team were in that major that he talked to his assistant coach in charge of academic monitoring to make sure they weren't being steered in that direction.

It's also factual that he brought academic counselor Wayne Walden with him from Kansas to Chapel Hill, and that the damning report revealed that Walden worked closely with AFAM mastermind Deborah Crowder to put basketball players into those classes.

Williams can make valid claims that 2005 was just his second year with the program and that he had no idea the sham classes that had been going on for years before he arrived were being used so heavily by his players.

But it's also revealed in the Wainstein Report that his players continued to take those AFAM classes for a couple of years after he asked they not be clustered in that major.

McCants' transcript reveals he took 28 classes in three years at the school. In 10 non-AFAM classes, he had six Cs, one D and three Fs. In AFAM, he received 10 As, six Bs, one C and one D.

What academic counselor and assistant coach looks at those numbers and concludes that everything is kosher?

Do the math, and it's hard not to conclude that Carolina won a national championship with players who were eligible to play at least in part because they were given grades they didn't earn.

One team, one academic year, 35 enrollments in sham classes.

Does that sound like a series of unwitting students getting bad advice or the calculated steering of athletes to participate in a fraud?

It will be up to the NCAA to decide if the Tar Heels used ineligible players, which would mean forfeitures of games and vacating the national title.

And whether the banner that suspends from the rafters of the Smith Center comes down or not, it's a real tough sell to proclaim that it hangs there proudly.

This is the opinion of senior writer Keith Jarrett. Contact him at 232-5867 or kjarrett@citizen-times.com. And find him on Facebook and Twitter @JarrettKeith.

 

BY THE NUMBERS

Figures from North Carolina's 2004-05 national championship basketball team that took a large number of sham classes in the African American Studies program.

35: Number of enrollments in AFAM classes during the school year.

33: Number of wins.

10: Number of players who majored in AFAM.

16.4: Points per game average of Asheville's Rashad McCants.

3.5: McCants' spring semester grade-point average after taking four AFAM classes.

1.3: McCants' GPA in non-AFAM classes over three-year period.

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November 13, 2014
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Daily Tar Heel: $5 million unaccounted for? Slush fund?

$5 million for advising nowhere to be found

The chancellor said UNC has spent $5 million on restructuring advising.

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ri?ts=1fHBpZD01MzY4NzA5NjJ8cmlkPTNjYTg5MzAyLTNiMWUtNDJhMy05OTlhLWYyY2JlZjFhM2Y5NnxydD0xNDE1OTA0MTI2fGF1aWQ9NTM2ODcxOTA1fGF1bT1ETUlELldFQnxzaWQ9NTM2ODcxMTAwfHB1Yj01MzY4NzE0OTl8cGM9VVNEfHJhaWQ9OTVhMjVlZmYtZjJiMi00ODBjLTkwYWYtY2NhZDg0MTFhMmJmfGFpZD01Mzc0NTY0NDB8dD0xfGFzPTQ2OHg2MHxsaWQ9NTM3MzAxNjE0fG9pZD01MzcxOTk5NjJ8cD0xMDAwfHByPTEwMDB8YWR2PTUzNzA5NzkyN3xhYz1VU0R8cG09UFJJQ0lORy5DUE18Ym09QlVZSU5HLk5PTkdVQVJBTlRFRUR8dXI9dzV6T1diS3FGZQ

The day after the report was released, Folt told The Daily Tar Heel the University had already spent $5 million to restructure its advising services.

Lee May, director of the Academic Advising Program, said in an email she has no knowledge of the money. Michelle Brown, head of the Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes and member of the Faculty Athletics Committee, said none of the $5 million Folt mentioned is coming to her program.

The Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes now directly reports to the Provost’s Office, which May said might account for the money Folt was talking about.

In the late 1980s, former Department of Athletics Director John Swofford, who is the current commissioner of the ACC, moved the program from the Department of Athletics to the College of Arts and Sciences, but Wainstein’s report said the program’s staff and managers still believed they reported to the Athletic Department’s administrators.

Joel Curran, a spokesman for Folt, did not respond to multiple requests for comment. Karen Moon, a spokeswoman for the University, said Folt was referring to a University-wide initiative to improve graduation rates.

As part of the White House summit on college access and success in January, Moon said UNC committed to spending $4 million during the next four years to raise 
graduation rates, focusing on low-income, first-generation and underrepresented students.

In an email, Moon said Provost Jim Dean formed a group of faculty and staff to create a plan to start the initiative. This group made its first annual investment of $459,200 last month, she said.

The Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes has seen a lot of changes in the last year.

In fall 2013, a team of five academic advisers in the College of Arts and Sciences came to the Loudermilk Center for Excellence to advise student-athletes, Brown said.

Since then, student-athletes have had to meet with an academic adviser once per semester instead of following the requirements for specific schools or majors, she said.

Brown said this helps athletes look long-term and plan their schedules with intention as they balance their academic and athletic schedules.

“The benefit is being able to be intentional of exactly how they can plan out their academics and be successful with their academics at the same time while they balance their athletics,” she said.

Brown also started an initiative called My Academic Plan, which provides student-athletes who are struggling with even more academic support.

Incoming student-athletes, transfer student-athletes or student-athletes who have a grade point average below 2.5 are assigned to the program. She said tutors for the program are also open to all student-athletes who are interested.

Brown said My Academic Plan replaced the prior study hall program for student-athletes. She said this program is a lot more specific to the individual and his or her situation.

“There’s lots of initiatives that together improve communication and awareness and all these pieces together hope to build an environment where we hope to reduce the opportunities for any of that to happen again.”

university@dailytarheel.com

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November 14, 2014
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bigten_numberone said
Daily Tar Heel: $5 million unaccounted for? Slush fund?

$5 million for advising nowhere to be found

The chancellor said UNC has spent $5 million on restructuring advising.

[Image Can Not Be Found]
Image Enlarger

ri?ts=1fHBpZD01MzY4NzA5NjJ8cmlkPTNjYTg5MzAyLTNiMWUtNDJhMy05OTlhLWYyY2JlZjFhM2Y5NnxydD0xNDE1OTA0MTI2fGF1aWQ9NTM2ODcxOTA1fGF1bT1ETUlELldFQnxzaWQ9NTM2ODcxMTAwfHB1Yj01MzY4NzE0OTl8cGM9VVNEfHJhaWQ9OTVhMjVlZmYtZjJiMi00ODBjLTkwYWYtY2NhZDg0MTFhMmJmfGFpZD01Mzc0NTY0NDB8dD0xfGFzPTQ2OHg2MHxsaWQ9NTM3MzAxNjE0fG9pZD01MzcxOTk5NjJ8cD0xMDAwfHByPTEwMDB8YWR2PTUzNzA5NzkyN3xhYz1VU0R8cG09UFJJQ0lORy5DUE18Ym09QlVZSU5HLk5PTkdVQVJBTlRFRUR8dXI9dzV6T1diS3FGZQ

The day after the report was released, Folt told The Daily Tar Heel the University had already spent $5 million to restructure its advising services.

Lee May, director of the Academic Advising Program, said in an email she has no knowledge of the money. Michelle Brown, head of the Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes and member of the Faculty Athletics Committee, said none of the $5 million Folt mentioned is coming to her program.

The Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes now directly reports to the Provost’s Office, which May said might account for the money Folt was talking about.

In the late 1980s, former Department of Athletics Director John Swofford, who is the current commissioner of the ACC, moved the program from the Department of Athletics to the College of Arts and Sciences, but Wainstein’s report said the program’s staff and managers still believed they reported to the Athletic Department’s administrators.

Joel Curran, a spokesman for Folt, did not respond to multiple requests for comment. Karen Moon, a spokeswoman for the University, said Folt was referring to a University-wide initiative to improve graduation rates.

Ummm, that alleged $5 million for revamping/enhancing academic tutoring for UNCHeat athletes is surely paying off:LaughWinkWinkWink

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---------------------------------------------

Perfect.

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November 14, 2014
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Paper Class IncImage Enlarger

 
 

Smith / Willingham Book

 

Cheated Mary WillinghamImage Enlarger

Cheated:

The UNC Scandal, the Education of Athletes, and the Future of Big-Time College Sports 

In 2010 allegations of an utterly corrupted academic system for student-athletes emerged from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill campus, home of the legendary Tar Heels. Now, however, the fallout of this scandal—and the continuing spotlight on the failings of college athletics—has made the school ground zero in the debate about how the $16 billion college sports industry operates.

Written by UNC professor of history Jay Smith and UNC athletics department whistleblower Mary Willingham,Cheated: The UNC Scandal, the Education of Athletes, and the Future of Big-Time College Sports exposes the fraudulent inner workings of this famous university. For decades, woefully underprepared basketball and football players have taken fake courses and earned dubious degrees from one of the nation’s top universities while faculty and administrators looked the other way. Cheated recounts the academic fraud in UNC’s athletic department and makes an impassioned argument that the “student-athletes” in these programs are being cheated out of what, after all, was promised them in the first place: a college education.

About The Authors

Jay M. Smith has been Professor of History at UNC-Chapel Hill since 1990. Between 1993 and 2013 he served almost without interruption in a variety of administrative capacities involving the management of undergraduate education. He has been an academic advisor for the College of Arts and Sciences, Director of Undergraduate Studies and Associate Chair of the History department, and, for nearly five years, he was the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Curricula in the College of Arts and Sciences. He supervised the implementation of a new General Education curriculum for the University in 2004-2006, a process that brought him into close contact with administrators across the campus. Between 2010 and 2013 he also served on the university’s Educational Policy Committee. A specialist in early-modern French history, he has published three major monographs and one edited book, all on the general subject area of French cultural and political history under the ancien régime.

Mary Willingham is the Founder of Paper Class Inc. She previously worked for The Center for Student Success and Academic Counseling (CSSAC) at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.  She was an Academic Advisor in the Graduation Division and a Clinical Instructor  in the School of Education. Originally hired by the University in 2003 as a Learning Specialist in the Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes, she moved to CSSAC in January of 2010. Other previous positions include High School Teacher and Corporate Human Resources Manager, Fortune 500 Companies.   Willingham has a BS in Psychology from Loyola University, Chicago, and an MA in Liberal Studies from UNC-Greensboro.  She earned a North Carolina Teaching License, K-12 Learning Disabled, and is a trained Reading Specialist. Her research includes studies on the NCAA and university admission procedures with regards to profit athletes, and their specific gaps in basic skill deficits, as well as the incidence of LD/ADHD.

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Mary Willingham

Founder of Paper Class Inc. Supporting Athletes' Rights to a Real Education. Previously - Learning Specialist at UNC-Chapel Hill. "My intentions are to help the amazing students who I served at Carolina from 2003-2010. We must offer equal access to a real education for ALL of our students."
 
Editorial Reviews

“The underlying fraud in big-time college athletics is academics. With the most comprehensive accounting, Smith and Willlingham paint an absolutely devastating picture of how so-called student-athletes are shamelessly exploited. . . . Cheated is nothing less than an American tragedy.”—Frank Deford, author of The Entitled and senior contributing writer for Sports Illustrated

“This book informed me that, as a black athlete and a student, more awareness and information about the universities you attend must be thoroughly analyzed before making a decision about your future. The details of fraudulent education and unprepared black athletes in this book should shame our society. I am a living testimony that this book is the Pandora’s box of university secrets and black athlete exploitation. It is a must-read.”—Rashad McCants, former NBA player and unc NCAA Champion

“Smith and Willingham’s exposé of the corruption at the University of North carolina reads like a suspense thriller but unfortunately is nonfiction. The authors offer concrete recommendations for college sports reform that should serve as a blueprint for all American universities.”—Gerald Gurney, president of the Drake Group and assistant professor of adult and higher education at the University of Oklahoma

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November 14, 2014
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The Daily Tar Heel channels the News and Observer's Dan Kane:

More evidence emerges on Jan Boxill

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Jan Boxill

According to the report by independent investigator Kenneth Wainstein, the sports ethics scholar steered athletes to fake classes in the Department of African and Afro-American Studies to help them maintain eligibility to play and graduate.

In a spring interview with The Daily Tar Heel, Boxill, former chairwoman of the faculty, said she never got the chance to completely push her conversations with faculty beyond the academic scandal.

“We were expecting a new page, but I’m not sure we got it,” Boxill said in April. “There’s not one Faculty Council meeting I had in my three years that athletics isn’t brought up. Either I do, the chancellor does or the Faculty Athletics Committee. With the announcement of the Wainstein review, it was another page but not the kind of page we may have thought.”

Emails show Boxill, a philosophy professor, offered 160 independent study courses between spring 2004 and spring 2012, according to records obtained by The Daily Tar Heel.

Wainstein’s report found employees in the African and Afro-American studies department offered fake paper courses for 18 years — and Boxill encouraged athletes to take the classes. But the Wainstein report, like every report on UNC’s academic-athletic scandal, has found the academic irregularities were limited to the African and Afro-American studies department.

But emails released as supplementary documents with the Wainstein report show athletes were also steered to independent study courses Boxill taught. The philosophy professor and former director of the Parr Center for Ethics did not respond to requests for comment for this story.

Boxill was embedded in UNC and its athletics program. A master lecturer in the philosophy department, she taught a long-standing class on sports ethics and brought in regular guest speakers like men’s basketball coach Dean Smith. As faculty chairwoman, she attended regular meetings with former Chancellor Holden Thorp’s administration.

Her popularity was not limited to undergraduates and colleagues — women’s basketball players emailed her often. Players opened their friendly messages with “Hey mom” and “Hey pal.”

UNC women’s basketball coach Sylvia Hatchell said Boxill completely oversaw the teams’ academics, making herself available for players at all hours of the day. Hatchell said she never saw any red flags.

Hatchell remembers one instance of Boxill discussing the civil rights movement with players on the bus. Boxill, who grew up during the 1960s, told the players stories about Martin Luther King, Jr.

“That’s why she was so good,” Hatchell said. “She had such a connection with the athletes.”

Independent studies under Boxill

Marc Lange, the current chairman of the philosophy department said independent studies are uncommon because the department has wide course offerings. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, chairman of the department between 2001 and 2011, said more than 150 independent studies is an unusually large number.

“Why would a student take an independent study?” Lange said. “It’s only for extraordinarily well-qualified students for whom the course material is too elementary.”

Public records show Boxill would sometimes offer multiple students independent study courses each semester; for example, in spring 2005 she taught 20. UNC’s Public Records Office would not distinguish how many students enrolled in Boxill’s independent studies were student-athletes.

The emails released by Wainstein show some student-athletes were enrolled and steered to her courses — but his report doesn’t mention it.

In one case, Crowder referred a student to Boxill for an independent study course after the African and Afro-American studies department was no longer able to provide them — but that wasn’t the only instance.

In a 2006 email to Deborah Crowder, the secretary in the African and Afro-American studies department who Wainstein showed was largely responsible for the creation of the paper courses, football counselor Cynthia Reynolds discussed registering her players for new classes.

“Nice call on the Phil 30 (Boxill) correspondence course last semester,” the email said. “Didn’t know Jan was doing those.”

In emails from later that year, Reynolds asked Boxill to take on a student for an independent study on sports ethics.

In another case, women’s soccer counselor Brent Blanton referred a student to Boxill who was looking for an independent study. In an email to Blanton, the student said she didn’t care if the course was “basket weaving.”

As of fall 2012, faculty are only permitted to offer two students independent study courses per semester.

Lange said he can count on one hand the number of independent study courses he’s taught since joining UNC in 2003.

Men’s basketball tutor Janet Huffstelter emailed Boxill in 2007, asking her for advice on an upcoming quiz in philosophy.

“(Redacted) had a tough week,” Huffstelter said. “I’m sorry he waited until the last minute to call me in for help. I guess it’s not unusual, though.”

Boxill responded with at least six specific questions that could be on the quiz, according to the emails.

Almost all of Boxill’s emails that were released were either her talking about, or to, students. “I will do whatever I can to help you obtain your degree,” she said in one email.

In another: “Just talked with Betsy Taylor in Steele Bldg, and she said she is making you a candidate for May, and that we are correct-all you need to do to is to PHIL with an A-!! And THAT will be done!!! This so great.”

One student emailed Boxill, asking why she hadn’t heard from Boxill about the independent study course in a few weeks. Another student was looking for a way to get six hours to keep his or her Pell Grant, and Boxill suggested six hours of a philosophy or African and Afro-American independent study.

Another student asked for an extension on a paper, and Boxill replied: “I have to say this is getting ridiculous! You have had the entire term to do *VERY MINIMAL* work.”

In 2009, Boxill said she might apply for Wayne Walden’s position as a tutor for the men’s basketball team, saying coaches Roy Williams and Joe Holladay “would be grateful” if she did apply — or they would also be comfort able with Mary Willingham.

Philosophy students now must fill out an independent study request form, which is submitted to the Director of Undergraduate Studies, who will send it to members of the Undergraduate Committee.

The only person who would know whether academic irregularities occurred in Caldwell Hall classrooms is Jan Boxill, Lange said.

“It’s only recently that the University required independent studies to have that kind of paper trail.”

That highly autonomous academic culture is exactly what led to UNC’s academic-athletic scandal, according to the Wainstein report.

“This hands-off management approach was laudable as a means of fostering academic creativity but lamentable as a mechanism for detecting and preventing the type of academic misconduct that existed in the AFAM department for so many years,” Wainstein found.

‘Horribly betrayed’

Colleagues, like Coach Hatchell, said Boxill was one of the most ethical people they’d ever met.

The findings of the Wainstein report largely misrepresented Boxill, said Kit Wellman, chairman of the Washington University in St. Louis’ philosophy department. He studied under Boxill and now, even in light of the Wainstein report, considers her one of his heroes and models.

“She feels horribly betrayed by a University she served selflessly for decades,” he said.

After initial reports of academic fraud, Wellman said Boxill was shocked.

“The idea that she was complicit and knew the stuff was going on is utterly implausible,” he said. “The investigators have to come to their conclusions. I don’t believe it.”

Senior Colleen Ciszek said Boxill’s compassionate nature made her a great mentor — she once helped Ciszek when she went through a tough time.

“I definitely don’t think this was ever a giant scheme to push some agenda and undermine the integrity of the University and athletics on campus,” she said. “She’s always been such a good advocate for those who are disadvantaged.”

university@dailytarheel.com

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A sports education

College athletics has a glaring problem: In a $16 billion industry, everyone gets paid ­except the players.

Traditionally, the quid pro quo has been this: In exchange for playing for their schools — mEditorialEditorialany of which make a fortune from their players — athletes would be given, free, a college ­degree.

But when those degrees become cheapened, the bargain is off and litigation begins.

Let’s start with the ongoing scandal that is the University of North Carolina. UNC has been in the headlines of late because of charges it was letting its “student athletes” get credits they really hadn’t earned.

First the university resisted the charges — publicly questioning the integrity of the accusers.

Now Chapel Hill has admitted that for 18 years, more than 3,100 students took what were essentially phony classes, and half of those who took them were student athletes.

It is a shocking disservice, because while it may help the basketball program, it leaves the players who effectively worked for the school without the real college degree they had been promised.

That’s the gist of a class-action lawsuit filed by former UNC linebacker Michael McAdoo. McAdoo argues that he and fellow former UNC athletes were promised a quality education by coaches, only to be steered “into a ‘shadow curriculum’ of bogus courses which never met and which were designed for the sole purpose of providing enrollees high grades.”

It’s going to be hard for UNC to argue with that.

Or look at former South Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore. After two devastating injuries during his junior year, Lattimore was faced with two choices:

He could give the NFL a shot and hope to be drafted and signed, or he could return to South Carolina, risking another injury, which would end any chance for the $2.45 million contract the San Francisco 49ers offered.

Not surprisingly, he chose to go pro. Two years later, he’s just announced he’s retiring from football and intends to go back to Carolina to finish his degree. The catch is he will have to pay for it himself.

Probably this won’t be a hardship for Lattimore. But too many athletes do not realize they will not make the pros until after they have used up their scholarships, leaving them with the worst of all worlds: no pro career and no college degree.

Colleges have many choices: Expand student eligibility, allowing students to finish their degrees after their sports eligibility has run out. Or pay student-athletes. Or pay college coaches a couple million less.

Or honor the original deal: sports in exchange for a real degree.

 

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Gerald Gurney, president of the Drake Group, whose mission is "to defend academic integrity in higher education from the corrosive aspects of commercialized college sports," said the findings should provide fodder for the NCAA to levy one of its most severe charges against UNC: lack of institutional control.

"I can safely say that the scope of the 20-year UNC fraud scandal easily takes the prize for the largest and most nefarious scandal in the history of NCAA enforcement. The depth and breadth of the scheme -- involving counselors, coaches, academic administrators, faculty, athletic administrators, etc. -- eclipses any previous case," Gurney said.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/22/.....mic-fraud/

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keggythekeg said
Gerald Gurney, president of the Drake Group, whose mission is "to defend academic integrity in higher education from the corrosive aspects of commercialized college sports," said the findings should provide fodder for the NCAA to levy one of its most severe charges against UNC: lack of institutional control.

"I can safely say that the scope of the 20-year UNC fraud scandal easily takes the prize for the largest and most nefarious scandal in the history of NCAA enforcement. The depth and breadth of the scheme -- involving counselors, coaches, academic administrators, faculty, athletic administrators, etc. -- eclipses any previous case," Gurney said.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/22/.....mic-fraud/

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Firm charges UNC $1.65 million for PR on fraud scandal, other work

Posted by Dan Kane on November 18, 2014 Updated 21 hours ago

The amount of money UNC is spending on outside public relations in the wake of the academic fraud scandal is crossing past $2 million.

A copy of the contract provided under a public records request shows Edelman will receive more than $1.65 million for public relations services over the period of a year, ending April 30, 2015. The contract is not specific as to what kinds of services the firm will provide, but UNC officials confirmed last month that at least 14 employees from the firm worked on the public release of former U.S. Justice Department official Kenneth Wainstein’s report on the scandal.

Wainstein’s report confirmed that the scandal had its roots in keeping athletes eligible to play sports, particularly in the revenue sports of basketball and football. Nearly half of the 3,100 students who took the fraudulent classes in the long-running scheme were athletes.

UNC had previously spent roughly $500,000 combined on two other firms and a public relations consultant.

Joel Curran, UNC’s vice chancellor of communications and public affairs, said Edelman’s work goes beyond responding to the academic scandal. He said the firm, which bills itself as the world’s largest, is also helping the university revamp its overall communications strategy.

Just like the other public relations work, Edelman’s costs will not be covered with state funds or tuition dollars, UNC officials say.

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November 20, 2014
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Roy Williams, the Sgt. Schultz of college coaches ("I know notthhhinnggggg"), says he will coach at UNCH for as many as 10 more years!Laugh

http://www.newsobserver.com/20......html?rh=1

Probably be lucky to finish this season.

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November 21, 2014
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Accrediting commission says UNC 'not diligent' in exposing academic scandal

By Dan Kane

dkane@newsobserver.comNovember 21, 2014 Updated 1 hour ago
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UNC5NE102214CEL

Kenneth Wainstein, a partner with Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft, holds up the report on UNC-Chapel Hill's academic problems in association with the athletics department during a news conference Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, in Chapel Hill.

CHUCK LIDDY — cliddy@newsobserver.com Buy Photo

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The commission that accredits UNC-Chapel Hill is raising new concerns about the university's academic integrity, saying that it had not been diligent in providing information about the scandal and that two employees had knowledge of problems that were not shared during the commission's first investigation.

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges is now embarking on its second investigation into the academic fraud that began in 1993 and lasted 18 years. It sent UNC a letter that the university made public Friday outlining the commission's new concerns.

A report last month by Kenneth Wainstein, a former top U.S. Justice Department official, found nearly 190 lecture-style classes that never met and hundreds of bogus independent studies. None had any instruction, requiring only a paper that drew a high grade from a departmental manager who admitted she didn't read them.

Last year, the commission passed on sanctions or probation for UNC after a review that lasted several months. At that time, the commission accepted UNC's position that only two people participated in the scandal: Julius Nyang'oro, the former chairman of the African and Afro-American Studies Department, and his longtime department manager, Deborah Crowder. He was allowed to retire in 2012; she had retired in 2009.

The new review by Wainstein and a team of lawyers from a Washington, D.C., firm found several others knew the classes didn't meet, drew high grades and had no instruction, but did not report them to the administration. The investigation also found numerous others, including some coaches, knew the classes didn't meet and were easy, but did not know they lacked a professor.

In another development Friday, UNC released Wainstein's bill for the investigation. The firm is billing UNC $3.1 million for the first eight months of the investigation, which includes the release of the report. It was unclear if Wainstein has continued to work for the university.

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/20.....rylink=cpy

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More Felonies-- UNC players use spray paint to deface Duke locker room at Duke. At least $10,000 damage. No class.

 

http://www.heraldsun.com/news/.....ocker-room

According to sources at both schools, light blue spray paint caused “significant” damage to the visiting team locker room in Duke’s Brooks Practice Facility, which is adjacent to Wallace Wade Stadium.

Interior and exterior walls as well as the carpet were painted, causing thousands of dollars in damages.

The letters "UNC" were also painted on a wall next to a door entering the facility.

-----

Both Fedora and Bubba have called to apologize, and UNC will pay for repairs.

Damage costs are estimated to be over $10,000.

Fedora claims he only found out the next day.  He also said no players will be disciplined.

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Now UNC is being investigated for Pell Grant Fraud--probably due to basketball and football players' taking fraudulent classes to stay academically eligible to receive Pell Grant money.

 


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keggythekeg said
Now UNC is being investigated for Pell Grant Fraud--probably due to basketball and football players' taking fraudulent classes to stay academically eligible to receive Pell Grant money.

 


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Washington Post column blasts corruption at UNCH sports and education cheating and 20 year system of fraudulent classes:

Florida State and North Carolina: Two especially embarrassing examples of academic squalor

 

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bigten_numberone said

keggythekeg said
Now UNC is being investigated for Pell Grant Fraud--probably due to basketball and football players' taking fraudulent classes to stay academically eligible to receive Pell Grant money.

 


Embedded image permalinkImage Enlarger

Washington Post column blasts corruption at UNCH sports and education cheating and 20 year system of fraudulent classes:

Colleges

Florida State and North Carolina: Two especially embarrassing examples of academic squalor

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/.....227229e7b_

Active hiding of truth continues at UNCHeat:

News and Record Editorial

Secrecy continues

Saturday, November 29, 2014 12:00 am

When Carol Folt said nine UNC-Chapel Hill employees would be fired or disciplined for their role in a long-running academic scandal, she didn’t add a taunt to the public: See if you can figure out who.

Nevertheless, the chancellor and her subordinates won’t give out that information. Their refusal to comply with the law prompted the News & Record and other media organizations to file a suit demanding disclosure.

The next day, UNC released the name of one fired employee, former academic counselor Jamie Lee. That’s a start.

This isn’t only about the law. It’s a matter of accountability. Former federal prosecutor Kenneth Wainstein’s report named a number of faculty and staff members who knew or should have known that students were enrolled in “paper” classes for which they did little work yet received good grades. The purpose was to keep athletes academically eligible for competition.

Little punishment has been handed out for this fraudulent activity. The principal architect of the scheme, an administrator in the Department of African and Afro-American Studies, retired in 2009. The department’s chairman was allowed to retire in 2012, even after many details of the scandal were known. What of other individuals?

People who work for a state university are public employees. Among information that must be disclosed is any demotion, suspension or dismissal, as well as the reasons for dismissal.

The university contends that, while appeals of disciplinary actions are ongoing, the information isn’t subject to release. However, in September UNCG said it fired three employees in its University Relations Department, although their appeals were pending. UNCG did not provide full information, which was supplemented by arrest warrants, but it disclosed more than has its sister institution in Chapel Hill — and for a much less serious matter, as it turned out.

The Chapel Hill administration, going back to the tenure of former Chancellor Holden Thorp, has meted out information reluctantly. Meanwhile, it’s spent a fortune on public relations. Now it could spend more money defending itself from a lawsuit that seeks only compliance with the law. If it has taken disciplinary action against faculty and staff members, it must say who, what and why.

The public has a right to know. This scandal has tarnished the reputation of our state university system’s flagship institution. This month, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges asked UNC to show how it’s meeting its “comprehensive standards” in light of revelations in the Wainstein report. A letter from the commission’s vice president indicated it was misled when it last inquired into past practices in 2013.

It’s time for the university to try openness. While Folt’s administration can be credited for launching Wainstein’s investigation and making changes in academic oversight, continuing to hide information is wrong.

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US legislation would create presidential commission for college sports

dkane@newsobserver.comDecember 4, 2014 

http://www.newsobserver.com/20......html?rh=1

A retiring Virginia congressman filed bipartisan legislation this week that would set up a presidential commission to look into several high-profile issues with college sports, including the academic fraud that spanned 18 years at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Rep. Jim Moran, a Democrat with a suburban Washington, D.C., district, said the legislation has no chance of passing in the lame-duck session of Congress. But he said he wanted to get things started.

“It may be one of the two bipartisan pieces of legislation that actually has a chance in this new upcoming Congress,” he said.

The legislation joins a handful of other bills filed in the past year or so to deal with concerns that big-money college sports have overtaken the academic missions of universities. Moran has 10 co-sponsors, three of them Republicans.

Moran, a former football player at Holy Cross, said the UNC scandal helped drive his legislation.

“It was one of those straws that broke the camel’s back,” he said. “It’s just been an accumulation of things that are very troubling, and UNC, unfortunately, is not by any means unique.”

The presidential commission of sports experts and congressional members would “identify and examine” the issues surrounding college sports, and make recommendations to try to fix them. Among the issues identified are whether colleges are sacrificing academic integrity to build winning sports teams and risking the health, safety and financial well-being of athletes who are not allowed under NCAA rules to profit from their names and likenesses.

The commission would also take up due process concerns for athletes accused of NCAA violations.

“It’s almost like a serf system, indentured servitude,” Moran said. “The people are making themselves enormously wealthy in some cases while the kids get injured and cast aside.”

Moran said he is attending a closed-door meeting with U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan, former NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue and others on Tuesday to talk about the issues facing college sports.

There are no North Carolina representatives sponsoring the bill. Moran said U.S. Rep. David Price, whose district includes UNC, is concerned about college sports. Price has filed a bill seeking more financial transparency from college athletic programs, the NCAA, athletic conferences and bowls.

One North Carolina lawmaker who could be key to the passage of Moran’s legislation is U.S. Rep. Virginia Foxx. The Banner Elk Republican is chair of the House Subcommittee on Higher Education.

Foxx has said little publicly about the scandal. Moran said he will talk to her about his bill.

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Re: unc scandal- Prongs etc - MW&JSmith speak@DSC / AFAMscam  from Manulishi


A few brief notes as we approach mid-week…. mid-month… mid-scandal? (let's hope not...)   Regarding more news stories; they are coming.  Several have already been assigned dates of publication by department editors.  The last thing I will do, though, is deep-six any writer and his/her projects – so please excuse (and respect) the vague-ness.  I know it is irritating, but also necessary. The holiday season is often a slow time for the publication of stories; if all continues as scheduled, that will be slightly different this December.
 
  Along the lines of the media: It was stated (right here) several years ago that the really big news would stop being broken on PP as soon as the media fully took the bull by the horns.  A month or so after the PJ situation that finally happened.  Many, many other items surfaced (via the media) that could have initially appeared here – but as long as those journalists continue to show the effort and desire to pursue the issues, then they will be given that opportunity.  While it is nice for PP to get some recognition and praise, practicality must also be considered.  The truth is, certain mainstream media outlets have a much wider reach.  And besides, having everyone know that YOU know shouldn’t be a necessity to self-worth and self-gratification. So yes, more is coming, but as always, you’ve just got to be patient.
 
  Regarding the latest Wainstein rumors (and the possibility that UNC might challenge the findings in his report). That would be an error on their part of amazing proportions.   As I posted in the early Fall, some events transpired over the summer that ultimately turned the tide of that report.  (the exotic animal… remember?) What the movers-and-shakers in CH did not understand (or did not WANT to understand) is that Wainstein was neither a.) shackled by the “good ol’ boy” system in NC, nor b.) subject to excessive political pressure/influence from D.C. (like certain past PR hires). Put simply, he couldn’t be bought (in a manner of speaking) – at least not to the extent that it was worth risking his professional reputation.  The man is still young, for all practical purposes, and has more career ahead of him.  Not everyone who has plenty of money simply wants to retire and kick back at the country club (which was also hard for some of those movers-and-shakers to fathom).  Some people have a true drive to research, to work, and to meet personal goals.
 
The second folly was that when he couldn’t be bought (again, in a manner of speaking), the bigger mistake was an attempt at bullying.    Thus, any sort of post-report challenging would be very bad.  As I mentioned earlier, several things happened back over the summer.  NONE of that has been made officially public, nor do I think it ever will.  But some of the finer details, should they “slip” out, would make unc wish that the originally-released 900 pages of supplemental info was all that had happened.  
 
More to ponder:  If unc ever formally challenges the Wainstein Report it will be due to “advice” given to them by their current PR team.  (the “group of 14”) If the challenge comes to fruition, it will be an epic public fiasco… and who do you think will (financially) profit from having to concoct ways to defend unc’s reputation (during the ensuing fiasco), publically?  Think on that infinity symbol for a bit. The irony is that unc themselves cannot see the connection.
 
An even bigger irony?  There have been whispers that two of the 14 could be looking for new jobs in the near future.  Let’s see if the reasons ever leak out.  
 
Finally:  unc’s punishment. Will they get what they “deserve”?  No. But that’s a qualified “no”… because ALL of the wrongs that have taken place will never come out, and more importantly: nor should they. When unc (meaning, J. Martin) said “this wasn’t an athletic scandal”, he didn’t know it – but he was ironically correct. If all the details ever came out then the subsequent fallout would ruin many, many lives, and that does not need to happen.   Now don’t misunderstand me.  I am all for accountability, especially when it comes to those who have blatantly circumvented rules in order to win basketball games, lie to parents of recruits, etc. etc.   
But what is being referred to here are the “innocents” who would be affected. Hypothetical:  if a 75-year-old bigwig S.O.B. was revealed to have broken rules, legally and/or ethically, and that played a vital role in everything that has ultimately transpired at unc for (well over, by the way) 18 years, should he/she be exposed?  That is a tricky question, but I pose a deeper dilemma:  the person did wrong, true.  But did his/her 50-year-old children know, and have they taken an active role in the affair?   Those offspring have 25-year-old children themselves, which means the S.O.B. might have some grandchildren in diapers.  Are those TODDLERS to be condemned due to one person’s actions?   That is the situation of what is whispered, rumored, and in some instances factually known in regards to the true depth of the scandal.  And it is also why I personally do not feel it ever needs to be known.   I realize that some may disagree, and that is fine.  If you ever become privy to the specific facts and details and you want to expose them, then it is your right.  It will also, however, be your moral stigma to deal with.
 
  My goal (meaning, unc’s accountability/punishment) has always been set, and has not really wavered over the years.  It is less than what many on PP have bandied around, and is certainly less than what would result from a full-disclosure of all the corners of the closet.   (there’s no real reason to go into specifics)   As long as the NCAA does not somehow, someway, fold, then I feel it will happen.  In fact, at some point I feel that the bigwigs might decide it’s best that it happens, as well.  On the flipside, there is the same roadblock as has been evident for 4+ years: there might be too many chiefs (75-year-old SOB’s?) to reach than consensus. 
 
 
I know this isn’t news to anyone on PP, but every “leader” at the school (and in the BOT and BOG) is nothing but a pawn and figurehead.  Best case scenario, they truly are naïve enough to believe the obfuscation is simply about athletics (and they are okay to go along with the denials and lack of owning-up).   The bigger question is whether any of the bigwigs (with the real power and influence) connected to CH will ever realize that losing a little bit of athletic prestige (past, current, and short-term future) truly IS worth keeping all of those dark secrets buried.  They have tried to protect some pieces of cloth for several years now, morals be damned.  But when it comes to one’s posterity, then I think we could eventually see some concessions being made – voluntarily.  It would most certainly be the most prudent course of action, and I don’t say that as a rival – I say it as one who feels that the sins of the very old should not destroy the futures of the very, very young.  
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Sylvia says her team may surprise you.   http://www.wralsportsfan.com/u...../14969302/

Interesting Quote...
“Myself and none of the coaches have been mentioned and women's basketball hasn't been mentioned,” Hatchell said. “It's academic councilors with women's basketball. If there is no allegation how can there be penalties?

Sounds exactly what Roy Williams said:

From the Wainstein Report:
- Over the 18-year period, athletes made up 1,871 of the enrollments in the paper classes. Of the enrollments, the football team accounted for 51.4 percent (963), the men's basketball team 12.1 percent (226) and the women's basketball team 6.1 percent (114). 

- Breakdown of enrollments in the paper classes by men's basketball coach (13 scholarships; often not fully allotted, but using that number for calculation): 

Bill Guthridge - 17 in 3 years (5.7 per year)
Matt Doherty - 42 in 3 years (14 per year)
Roy Williams - 167 in 6 years (27.8 per year; more than 2.1 per scholarship athlete, assuming the full allotment of13 scholarships)

From the NOA:

The AFRI/AFAM department created anomalous courses that went unchecked for 18 years. This allowed individuals within ASPSA to use these courses through special arrangements to maintain the eligibility of academically at-risk student-athletes, particularly in the sports of football, men's basketball and women's basketball.

First of all, the academic advisor for women's basketball was specifically referenced in one of the five allegations.  Second, there is the fifth allegation that emphasizes women's basketball (and men's), which is quoted above

Sylvia Hatchell and Roy Williams seem to believe if their individual names were not specifically mentioned, there are no allegations against them and there is no problem, notwithstanding the fact their programs are mentioned throughout the Wainstein Report and the NOA. 

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